Ep. 94 – Did the House You Are Buying Pass Inspection?

Matthew Maschler:
Welcome to the Real Estate Finder podcast. I’m Matthew Maschler, real estate broker with the Signature Real Estate Companies here in the great state of Florida, and with me, my real estate partner, Jill Glanzer. Hi, Jill. How are you?
Jill Glanzer:
I’m doing great today. How are you?
Matthew Maschler:
I’m doing alright. Jill just showed a beautiful house in the oaks of Boca Raton. Is it the Oaks of Boca Raton? The oaks at
Jill Glanzer:
Boca Raton. The Oaks at Boca Raton. At
Matthew Maschler:
Boca Raton, but they don’t use a little at symbol. They spell
Jill Glanzer:
That they use the actual word at
Matthew Maschler:
The oaks at Boca Raton. And I remember when that was still like a project and it was brand new and they were advertising all over and in the mall, a country club alternative. And it’s been a long time that we’ve been selling at the Oaks, at Oak Ratone, but that’s not what I’m here today to talk about. I want to talk about home inspections and when you buy a house really anywhere, you have to get the house inspected. In Florida, the most common contract we use is the as is contract, and the name as is. It’s kind of misleading. A lot of sellers believe, well, it’s an as is contract, and I don’t have to do anything because the contract’s as is.
It’s not an As is contract in that the seller doesn’t have to do anything as is in that the buyer has the right to cancel if they don’t like the condition of the property during the home inspection. So sellers, even though they think, well, the properties as is, take it or leave it because they become emboldened by the title. A lot of buyers are also under misconception that the house has to somehow pass an inspection. The buyer orders an inspection report, and sometimes as realtors, we tend to oversimplify the process. We suggest an inspector, the buyer hires the inspector, and then at the end of the inspection, the buyer says, did it pass? You’re laughing
Jill Glanzer:
Because you’ve seen this. Yeah, no, I’ve heard it before. From certain people, from certain places. I feel like it’s
Matthew Maschler:
Common. Yeah, it’s not an official inspection. It’s not a government inspection. The house can be on fire, right? It doesn’t pass an inspection. If the house is on fire, the inspector will simply note in the inspection report that the house was on fire. It’s up to the buyer to decide based on the inspection report, do they want to buy the house or not, and that’s really their choice. Buy the house or not. There is a third choice asking the seller to make repairs or to provide a credit, but you have to understand what you’re asking for. First off, if something was readily available at the time of the inspection, it’s almost unfair to ask the seller for a credit. If the roof was leaking, the buyer went in, so a big hole in the roof. So water coming down, saw a puddle on the floor and then made an offer, and the buyer and seller agreed upon the price.
It’s not fair for the buyer to now come back and say, oh, I have the house inspected and there’s a roof leak. However, if there was no hole in the ceiling, no signs of water damage, and it was perfectly dry, and the house was inspected and it was discovered that there was a roof leak, then the buyer is within their rights to ask. And that’s merely all they could do. They could ask. And if the seller says no to a credit or repair, the buyer can either buy the house or not buy the house. But then you have the occasion where there’s a roof leak and the inspector didn’t catch it. There’s no evidence of it, buyer didn’t know about it, and now it’s the walkthrough and the roof is leaking. Well, the seller can say, well, it’s always been like that. You just didn’t catch it.
Well, that’s not fair, because the buyer had no idea. It wasn’t readily observable and it wasn’t in the inspection report. The buyer might’ve presumed that the house was in good condition and the seller really should have disclosed that. So now the problem is when you go to the walkthrough and something is in worse condition than when you saw it, seller has the duty to maintain the property in good repair. So one thing we do with the walkthrough is we check the inspection report. If the damage was there at the time of the inspection report, or we look at the pictures of the multiple listing service, if the damage was there at the time of the pictures, then certainly the buyer has no right to ask for a repair. But if it was not in the inspection report, it was not in the pictures, then maybe this was new damage.
The seller’s obligated to repair it. What happens after the closing? It’s a week or a year after the closing, two weeks after the closing. I heard three stories about this in the last couple of weeks, two weeks after the closing, a leak in the bathtub or two weeks after the closing, a leak in the outside sprinklers. Well, it’s pretty much the buyer’s house the minute after the closing, but the cellar in Florida does have a duty to disclose material defects, right? It has to be significant important. And a big roof leak is material, but sometimes it’s up to a court to decide what is material, right? If it’s just a faulty G C I electrical outlet, maybe it’s not material, material defect that’s not readily apparent. So a hole in the ceiling is readily apparent, but a leaky ceiling and you’re in a very, very dry period, maybe not readily apparent. So I had a question recently. There was a barn and the barn wasn’t permitted.
So now that’s not really an inspection. Then there’s issues in the contract that there’s no un permitted work. There’s two different issues, open permits and unpermitted work. But yeah, if the buyer didn’t realize that there was unpermitted work and it’s after the contract, there’s an issue, the buyer sometimes says, can I go after the seller or can I go after the inspector for missing it? Well, that’s not the type of thing a seller might miss, that an inspector might miss. But I would think the only case is that the seller have the obligation to disclose it’s a material defect. The seller knew if the seller didn’t know no issue. So the question is, I called my inspector and then I said, do you check for unpermitted work? Because in my mind, how do you even know there’s unpermitted work? And our inspector does check for open permits.
But when you’re in your inspection period, one of the points I want to make is it’s up to you as a buyer to have your eyes open and ask a lot of questions, not just did it pass inspection. First, you want to look for open permits, and most inspectors will check for open permits. And I asked the inspector, I go, well, how would you know if there was unpermitted work? And he said, well, what you could do, and I don’t think this is the obligation of inspectors to do, but if you’re a buyer in your due diligence, if you have a question about unpermitted work, what you could do is pull the permits and compare. If the permit is 20 years old and the roof is three years old, right? Then it
Speaker 3:
Wasted
Matthew Maschler:
On permitted work,
Speaker 3:
Right?
Matthew Maschler:
This issue with the barn, right? If there was, I’ve heard some us given check the survey. Well, I don’t know if the survey would show the unpermitted work, the permit status. You could compare the survey to the property records. So you look in the government records, if the square footage is off, right,
Speaker 3:
Square
Matthew Maschler:
Footage of the house, you look at the survey for the square footage of the house, you look at the property records. If the property records show that it’s a 3000 square foot structure, and the survey shows that there’s a 4,000 square foot structure. While that a thousand square feet that’s not on the property records. That might be permitted work, but I don’t think it’s the inspector’s obligation to look for permitted structures and permitted work. But how would a buyer tell? Well, you’d look at the age of the permits. Do they compare with if there’s a hot water heater, brand new hot water heater and there’s no permit, then you can possibly find non permitted work. I don’t think there’s an issue with, you’re not going to find a defect with non permitted water heater, but with a barn or a roof, you might feel have an issue with that. So it’s very much buyer beware. Buyers want to point a lot of blame after the closing. Blame the inspector. Blame me. The buyer’s agent blame the listing agent. But sometimes buyers got to look in the mirror and blame themselves because it is their opportunity to do as much or as little research as they want. And we find a lot of buyers will get the inspection report and they might discuss, well, are there any issues? Well read it.
It explains all the issues. Is there anything I should be worried about? I don’t know your level of worry.
So what are some things I’ve always wanted to do this episode, and I don’t really have notes or anything prepared, but I wanted to think about what are the things that the home inspection doesn’t tell you? And I got this idea about a year ago when my client bought a condominium and went to move in and realized that there were no cable outlets. There was no place to plug their cable in. You usually have that little, I forget what the cable outlet’s called, but you have the thing in the wall and you plug your TV in. There were no cable outlets. The house had been redone and new flooring, tile, tile kitchen, and there was no place to plug in the cable. Now, maybe today, you don’t even need that, right? Everything being internet based and over the air. I just moved my son into his college dorm room and he bought a smart tv.
And just with the apps, nothing has to be plugged in, not, but traditional house, you might want to plug in that cable box. So the home inspector didn’t catch the fact that there were no cable jacks, but is that something that a home inspector would notice? A homeowner would notice it when they go to move in. So homeowners out there, when you are looking at a house, maybe not the first time, the first time you look at the house, it’s really to see if you want to buy it, maybe schedule a second showing are there enough outlets in the office, right? My office and my house does not have enough outlets. The designer didn’t put
Speaker 3:
Electrical outlets.
Matthew Maschler:
Electrical outlets in. There should have been an outlet put in on the floor under my desk for my computer and printer and phone and all this stuff that I don’t have a place to plug in. So see if there’s enough electrical outlets, see if there’s enough cable outlets, because that’s a personal question. That’s not something that’s going to pass or fail an inspection. So that’s something that an inspection of the house won’t tell you if there’s sufficient electrical outlets, if there’s sufficient for you cable jacks,
Jill Glanzer:
Right? No, exactly. Because they don’t know what you want or don’t want.
Matthew Maschler:
Quite often when there’s a home alarm system, I call my friend Peter Davidson from a d t alarms to come in and do an alarm inspection. Because I imagine my home inspector, I want to ask him, I imagine my home inspector inspects the alarm, right? Go to look at the alarm. Is there anything flashing? Turn it, set the alarm, turn it on, shut the alarm off. See if the alarm works. But that’s not going to tell you. Again, if it’s sufficient, if you bring in Peter Davidson for an alarm inspection, he’ll tell you this. Window’s not wired up. The inspection’s not going to tell you if 15 windows, right? The house, the homeowner put in storm windows, especially on a flip, right? The homeowner put in storm windows and sensors in those windows. There may or may not be a glass sensor, so it doesn’t pass inspection or fail inspection if there’s not enough or sufficient coverage of the alarm system. So I think the alarm system, the cable system also is another thing
Jill Glanzer:
To
Matthew Maschler:
Check. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a home inspector check the quality of the cable. When I bought my house, the picture was wavy,
Jill Glanzer:
Right?
Matthew Maschler:
It was.
Jill Glanzer:
They’re not plugging in a TV to a vacant house to see if the,
Matthew Maschler:
Or even, but if there’s a TV on,
Jill Glanzer:
They don’t really turn it on turn. Again, TVs are not part of the structure. So in their minds, they wouldn’t do that.
Matthew Maschler:
But turn the TV on and see. And I had terrible picture quality in my house. So much so that even though cable was included with my homeowner’s association, I got DirecTV. I found the picture to be unwatchable.
Jill Glanzer:
But that’s also like when you’re budgeting to buy a house, you have to think about those things, right? I mean, you really have to think, am I paying more for this? Like the alarm system, when I got my alarm system hooked up, it was an old alarm. I couldn’t tell by looking at it. But when Peter came in to rewire it, he noticed that it was old wiring, an old stuff that in the closet, and he needed to redo it. And that was an extra charge that I didn’t know about. So it’s good to know all of the things that you’re going to have to pay for once you move into the house that you wouldn’t know without somebody looking at it.
Matthew Maschler:
How is the wifi?
Jill Glanzer:
Yes, the wifi is big,
Matthew Maschler:
And sometimes you have houses with walls where the wifi doesn’t reach from one end of the house to the other end of the house, and you have to set up repeaters and stuff like that. So the inspector won’t tell you how the wifi is. How is the phone service? You walk in the house, you have at and t and you can’t make a phone call from the middle of the house,
Jill Glanzer:
Right?
Matthew Maschler:
Oh yeah. You get five G when you’re upstairs and you get your five G. When you’re in this room, you can get five G in the kitchen, but you can’t get five G in the dining room. And people buy a household without checking that the phones are, how good is the five G? And then different companies will be different. Right? At t will be different than Sprint or M C I. No sprint. There’s no sprint or M C I T-mobile. That’s old T-Mobile or cricket or metro PC S. There’s no sprint anymore.
Jill Glanzer:
I don’t know.
Matthew Maschler:
I don’t think there’s, so you want to hear another thing.
Jill Glanzer:
What
Matthew Maschler:
If there’s a leak in the pool? The inspector’s not going to check for leaks in the pool, right?
Jill Glanzer:
Because they’re not pool people. They might check for, if the pool heater’s working, they’ll check the pool equipment. They’ll check to see if the filter’s working, but they’re not going to know if there’s a leak or if it needs to be resurfaced.
Matthew Maschler:
So one of the things that you can do when you’re at the inspection is use a piece of tape, or I guess a piece of tape would make the most sense. Mark the pool where it’s filled, where the water’s filled to, and then after the inspections, see if the water level went down, down, down. Now let’s say the inspection’s only there for three hours. Three hours may not be enough time, but if you put some tape there at the top of the pool and three hours later it’s down an inch, there’s a serious leak in the pool.
Jill Glanzer:
True?
Matthew Maschler:
Usually you want to check it in a day. I know that if you think you have a leak in your pool, you use the bucket test, right? You fill up a bucket and then you mark the top line in the pool and you mark the top line in the bucket. You wait 24 hours. And if the bucket went down an eighth of an inch and the pool went down a full inch, then there’s a problem. I think the bucket evens out the evaporation. So a home inspection won’t tell you if the pool has a leak. They will look at the pool equipment to make sure it’s working. I don’t know how they can tell if the pool heater’s working. You can tell if the pool heater’s on,
Jill Glanzer:
But I don’t know if you can tell how well it heats, right? Because they don’t take a thermometer and check.
Matthew Maschler:
Well, you could,
Jill Glanzer:
But
Matthew Maschler:
You don’t know how the
Jill Glanzer:
Water, water
Matthew Maschler:
That temperature, right? Is
Jill Glanzer:
It the sun beating down on it?
Matthew Maschler:
Turn the heater on? How long does it take to heat the pool? I always thought it was one degree an hour. But although I don’t know if it makes a difference the size of the pool, but I always thought it takes an hour to heat a pool one degree. So if you’re having a pool party on Saturday at one o’clock and you turn your heater on before your guests come, it’s not going to heat the pool in time.
Jill Glanzer:
No.
Matthew Maschler:
You want to put that on a day or two in advance. But the home inspection won’t tell you the efficiency of a pool heater unless you order a radon test.
You don’t do a test for radon. And that’s not a big issue in Florida. I know when I lived in New Jersey, you always did a radon test and nobody was even sure if there was a problem with radon. But you’d look at the radon levels, especially in the basement, some gas that comes up from the earth. Since we don’t have basements in Florida, it’s not as much of an issue. Basements in New Jersey maybe didn’t have windows. So the gas kind of gets trapped there. And it’s always easy to mess with those radon tests because they set the rate on sensor overnight. So an unscrupulous seller might go down in the basement and if there is a window, open it up or use a fan or something to
Jill Glanzer:
That’s interesting. I’ve never heard of that. Also sinkhole, but that’s a Gainesville thing. When I lived in Gainesville, there would be a sinkhole under a house and you wouldn’t find out about it. So you needed a structural engineer to come. That’s a separate inspector, but an inspector himself couldn’t really tell that.
Matthew Maschler:
And then while a typical home inspector will look for evidence of mold,
Jill Glanzer:
They
Matthew Maschler:
Won’t do an air quality test for mold.
Jill Glanzer:
You need to hire an actual mold inspector.
Matthew Maschler:
You have an additional mold inspector.
Jill Glanzer:
And this may be controversial, but I’m going to say it just because we’re talking about real estate with mold too. We had a customer and talk about not disclosing. I remember a story from years ago where a customer brought a house. The agent that was the selling agent was also the owner and she bought the house. Everything went well with the inspection. She got repairs on things that needed to be done. Everything was great. She closed. Well, she went to go do some work in the bedroom and opened up the wall and realized that there was mold behind the wall. And it wasn’t airborne mold, but she was doing the work and she knew. And then it turns out she wound up hiring the same vendor that the owner used. And he’s like, oh, yeah, I covered this up.
Matthew Maschler:
So that owner knew about the mold material defect that was not readily available
Jill Glanzer:
And you couldn’t see it. There was no way you were going to know about that, right? If you’re in the house and the house looked perfect, you wouldn’t have ever known. But these kinds of things happen. You do assume some risk buying a house, you’re not going to know everything. There is going to be some things that might you just won’t see until you’re doing work on the house. And maybe the owner didn’t know about it. Hopefully the owner didn’t know about it.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah.
Jill Glanzer:
Also, bees. Remember the bees?
Matthew Maschler:
There was bees in one of the, I know, what do you call ’em? Coves, somewhere in the roof between the roof and the drain and the drains. What’s the drains called? I
Jill Glanzer:
Forget what it’s is. It gutters.
Matthew Maschler:
The gutters.
Jill Glanzer:
There was a bee behind, right? There was a bees nest. The inspector would’ve never seen that. And then what happened is the bees were coming in to the girl’s, and so they had to get the bees nest out,
Matthew Maschler:
And eventually the of it is actually the weight of the honey and whatnot is going to open up the roof, which is going to subject it to the weather and to the rain. It’s going to tear down on the gutters. It’s going to really cause a problem over time. But a Holman spoke inspector is like a general practitioner doctor. They’re generalists. If they find specific problems, they’ll refer to a specialist.
Jill Glanzer:
But
Matthew Maschler:
Sometimes, again, when the buyer takes this, did it pass view? There’s no evidence of mold. So we don’t call in a mold tester, but there’s things that the home inspector doesn’t inspect for like radon, unless there’s a reason. And then people will say, well, you’re going to spend all this money on a house. How do you not do a test? Well, is it important to do a radon test? Another test that people don’t do is sewer tests with scopes
Jill Glanzer:
To
Matthew Maschler:
Really go through the whole sewer system
Jill Glanzer:
And
Matthew Maschler:
Pipes and plumbing to really see what the condition of the pipes and sewer systems are there cracks or soft spots in the pipes. And that’s another test that I never ever see down here. In some areas of the country, it’s a lot more common to do a sewer. It’s called a sewer scope,
Jill Glanzer:
Right? I have a buyer who’s actually a builder up in Jersey, and when he came down for the walkthrough, he was like, oh, I should have brought my scope. Could you imagine that at a walkthrough? Somebody sticks his scope in and starts looking at the pipes. It’s like, you should have done that at the inspection if you wanted
Matthew Maschler:
To do it. It’s too late. It’s too late,
Jill Glanzer:
Right?
Matthew Maschler:
We’re destroying insects and termite. Generally we do that pest inspection, but it’s a good idea to just double check and ask about things like that. What else?
Jill Glanzer:
Well, I mean, we could talk about a problem that we encountered years ago.
Matthew Maschler:
What’s that?
Jill Glanzer:
Which was Chinese drywall.
Matthew Maschler:
Some
Jill Glanzer:
Builders had it, and so you had to get a separate inspector because you, yes, they could do some surface tests, like a general inspector could do some surface tests to see if there’s Chinese drywall. But if it was deep in the walls or something, you would have to hire a separate inspector to look that up.
Matthew Maschler:
And if the Chinese drywall’s not deteriorating, you wouldn’t know if it’s Chinese or not. Plus, if the builder is building multiple houses in a row, you don’t know where they got the last piece of drywall from one pallet and the first piece of drywall from another pallet. So you could test the wall on the left for Chinese drywall. And it’s not Chinese drywall, but the wall on the right might be Chinese drywall. So I don’t know if that there really is a test for Chinese drywall at all whatsoever.
Jill Glanzer:
When I did, I had a buyer do a test when it was actually claimed that it was remediated Chinese drywall. So it was out there in the public description. So they knew when they purchased it that it was remediated, and they wanted to make sure it was remediated correctly. So there were inspectors that could check for that, but they’d have to drill small holes into the wall. But that’s really very rare. It’s not something that happens a lot. And you would know about it.
Matthew Maschler:
Does the inspector, I’m trying to remember. If the inspector turns on the irrigation system for the
Jill Glanzer:
Landscaping, yes. Yeah, they do.
Matthew Maschler:
Turn that on, make sure that’s working.
Jill Glanzer:
But
Matthew Maschler:
You also want to look at the landscaping. Make sure that everything looks fresh to you. And it might just be a personal decision, but during your inspection period, you really want to spend as much time at the house as possible and really look at the landscaping to see if there’s something that’s too close to the house. Maybe there’s something dead, dead branches that are leaning towards that,
Jill Glanzer:
Right? Trees like invasive trees or trees that are too big that are there. But in the events of hurricane season, you might want to cut them back, and that’s going to be a cost to you. So just to work that into your budget.
Matthew Maschler:
We once had a buyer that after the closing went into the condominium, this new construction, and they couldn’t plug their alarm clocks or phone chargers into the outlets. The outlets were so new that they were very, very tight.
Jill Glanzer:
The
Matthew Maschler:
Buyer was very elderly and frail and didn’t have the strength to push them in. So I had to go in and I had to loosen up all the outlets. I had to go around the whole house and go out to all of the outlets and plug and unplug and plug and unplug, plug and unplug. So that’s the way she could go in and plug her own things in. But also on that day, there was sometimes an outlet is connected to a switch on the wall, so it could be an important outlet and connect it to a switch. So the outlet works. It just doesn’t work the way the homeowner wants it to work,
Jill Glanzer:
Right? The switch could be far across the other side of the room, and you thought it was closer,
Matthew Maschler:
Right? Or the switch just has to be in a certain position. But if you have your hairdryer and you’re in the bathroom and you can’t figure out why it’s not working, it’s because of the switch. So again, it’s not going to fail on inspection, and the inspector might even not make a note of it, but it may not be something that you like and right, you could fix
Jill Glanzer:
It. It’s not the best case scenario, but it’s workable. What a nice person you are to do that for somebody.
Matthew Maschler:
Well, she was very, very upset that the inspector missed it. And when I went to put my, I went, it
Jill Glanzer:
Was not easy.
Matthew Maschler:
I went to put the outlet in and it didn’t go in. I was like, this is very strange. These don’t fit out. And I just had a root strength at end. Another thing, inspectors don’t look for ghosts, right? If the house is haunted, if there’s ghosts,
Jill Glanzer:
You got to bring in Ghostbusters spirits.
Matthew Maschler:
The inspector will not
Jill Glanzer:
Inspect for ghosts.
Matthew Maschler:
For ghosts,
Jill Glanzer:
And even if someone died in the house, no one has to tell you, not in Florida. Anyway, we could do a whole episode on this, but I just watched a great show called Murder House Flip, and they actually, these were famous murders happened in these homes, and then these people would come in and flip the houses. It was great. If you ever get a chance, watch it. It’s just incredible.
Matthew Maschler:
During the inspection period, it’s also very important to read and understand all of the homeowners association or condo association rules and regulations, right? You’re given the rules for a reason. You have either during the inspection or when you receive them, sometimes you have time to review them, and you really want to learn those rules. You don’t want to find a situation where after you close, you find out that there’s no Overstreet parking
Jill Glanzer:
And
Matthew Maschler:
You just assume that you would park a car. You never told me as your real estate agent that, that you intended to have three or four cars and you were going to just go park ’em in the street in front of your house. Oh, no, the street doesn’t have overnight parking. So the home inspection isn’t going to tell you weird H O A or C O A rules. And you do have the right to cancel after reviewing those rules, but you have to really understand those rules. So ask a lot of questions about the homeowners association. Go to an H O A meeting, or go to the office and meet the H OA people
Jill Glanzer:
And talk to them.
Matthew Maschler:
Figure out,
Jill Glanzer:
I think I heard of a story. It wasn’t me, but another agent represented a buyer. The buyer moved in and they had a work truck. They were parking. They immediately got a violation and were told to move their work truck. They’re like, wait a minute. I had no idea. No, I gave you the H o A disclosure and
Matthew Maschler:
The work, the
Jill Glanzer:
Rules and regs,
Matthew Maschler:
Meaning it was painted. It had the name of
Jill Glanzer:
The company, name of the
Matthew Maschler:
Company number on it, but some HOAs don’t even allow pickup trucks.
Jill Glanzer:
Nope, exactly.
Matthew Maschler:
Right. And it’s not a work truck, it just happens to be your F one 50. Some HOAs don’t allow that. I know one community doesn’t allow pickup trucks on Sundays if there’s anything higher than the bed, even if there’s no riding on it. But some communities don’t allow pickup trucks at all.
Jill Glanzer:
So
Matthew Maschler:
You have to really check that out. Some don’t allow motorcycles,
Jill Glanzer:
Right? And if you’re a good agent too, another big thing you should check, especially if it’s an h o a community, what are the move in, in terms of moving in? When do they allow vendors? When did they allow moving trucks? Because if you don’t tell your people and they kind of forget and they schedule their mover for Friday, and trucks aren’t allowed in except for Sunday,
Matthew Maschler:
Now
Jill Glanzer:
They’re screwed.
Matthew Maschler:
Where I live, there’s no moving trucks on Sunday. And I once bought a piece of art and they came to deliver it in a U-Haul type of van, and they wouldn’t let ’em in on a Sunday. And I mean, I knew there was no, and it’s weird. They say there’s no service vehicles allowed on Sundays, which by the way, every mother’s day I’ve had flowers refused.
Jill Glanzer:
Oh my goodness.
Matthew Maschler:
Domino’s
Jill Glanzer:
Pizza. That’s crazy.
Matthew Maschler:
Domino’s Pizza has to take the light off. Now they still have the painted cars, but the roof light, they make them take the roof light off. But yeah, it’s crazy that I don’t have Mother’s Day flowers. I’ve had people refuse deliveries, but they allow pizza and they allow certain, it’s weird that they allow certain deliveries on Sundays, but what if you have a plumbing emergency,
Jill Glanzer:
Right, or an AC emergency?
Matthew Maschler:
Then it’s okay, right?
Jill Glanzer:
Well, you know what? I had a Mother’s Day emergency. I needed to deliver flowers.
Matthew Maschler:
So also you want to find out, get quotes on your insurance, right? The insurance might be more than you think of this. Think about the utility bills, the water bill, the gas bill. Find out what utilities the house has and who the utility provider is, right? If you’re in the city of Bo Ratton and City of Broker, Ratton Water, but if you’re in the county, it could be
Jill Glanzer:
It’s Palm Beach County Water,
Matthew Maschler:
Palm Beach County water. Does the house have natural gas?
Jill Glanzer:
Right?
Matthew Maschler:
Some houses don’t have natural gas, so look at the utilities, and it’s not going to fail in inspection if it doesn’t have natural gas. I remember my father bought a house and it had gas, and they never hooked up the gas, and it worked for years. And then one day the gas didn’t work anymore, and it turned out that there was a gas tank it,
Jill Glanzer:
It was a propane, a buried tank. It
Matthew Maschler:
Was a buried tank. They didn’t have natural gas. They went to cook one morning and then there was no gas. So they called the gas company, but there was no gas to the house, and they realized that they had the tank. So if your community doesn’t have gas and you’re on a propane tank, maybe you want to look into how much gas is in the tank. I would imagine the inspector would give you some information about
Jill Glanzer:
That.
Matthew Maschler:
But again, sometimes you have to ask. I’m sure they knew it was prop when they bought it, but they forgot
Jill Glanzer:
It happens.
Matthew Maschler:
So yeah, so those are all things that home inspectors don’t usually catch. They’re not under the obligation to catch. What about you? Have you had any experiences with homeowners, home inspectors failing to catch something that either they should have caught or that they wouldn’t be expected to? Email me, matt@realestatefinder.com. I’d love to hear your stories, and if there’s any interesting, I’d love to talk about them on the air. And then I think one day soon, I’d like to schedule one of my preferred vendors. Right now we’re using Sherlock Holmes, Todd and Jamie Riley for our home inspections. We’ve had great success, very happy customers with them. So hopefully we’ll get them on the air one day to do an episode of the podcast. But if you have any questions about anything that have to do with real estate, email Jill at Realestate Finder. We’d love to help you with your real estate needs, buying or selling a house in Florida. Sink. Think sinkhole. Think Signature Real Estate finder. I’m Matthew Ashler.
Jill Glanzer:
And I’m Jill Glanzer. You can also call us in the office at 6 1 2 0 8 3 3 3 4. The future looks bright and the storms pass by the sky’s dark blue. When it’s almost that time, light shows cameras flash when I pass living in the moment, forget about the, they saved the best for last. Matthew Mania. We about to make a splash. Life is a marathon full of sharp turns, got to keep pace while the hands on the clock turns five star real estate. I run a show. You can tell the bus in place electricity, energy if vibrate. I’m always on time, even if I’m, I make dreams come true. Living my life. Hope the same for you. Success in my real knows. You know what? It’s what time, what time it. It’s time. What time it’s got.