Ep. 12 – The As-Is Offer and the Unauthorized Practice of Law

Matthew Maschler:
Welcome to the Real Estate Finder podcast. I’m Matthew Maschler, the real estate finder. I’m a real estate broker in the state of Florida, and with me as always,
Staci Garcia:
Stacy Garcia, also a real estate finder.
Matthew Maschler:
Hi Staci How was your weekend?
Staci Garcia:
It was good. I worked.
Matthew Maschler:
You worked? Yeah. I heard you had an open house. I
Staci Garcia:
Had an open house. It was super busy and a lot of the people that came were unrepresented, so I got more clients and now I’m hoping to get them, find them places to live. And also I gave myself my offer. I gave myself an offer from someone who walked in the door.
Matthew Maschler:
So you were representing the buyer and representing the seller. Sometimes that can get confusing.
Staci Garcia:
And then I accepted my offer.
Matthew Maschler:
Your seller accepted your buyer’s offer.
Staci Garcia:
Yes. I’m hoping that all works out and then if that does, I’ll be celebrating in 2000. In 2022.
Matthew Maschler:
2022. I tell my agents, come on November 15th, if you have your sales goals for 2022, now’s the time we have to plant those seeds because we get offers and listings. Now those are going to close in January, so our 2021 numbers are almost up. Me, I had a very good 2021. I was just looking at my numbers, not to brag, but I like to average about $20 million in sales a year. I have about 19 million so far, but I have a million plus sale scheduled for the end of the month. Awesome. So yeah, so I dunno if I’m hoping it goes to, if it closes in December or closes in January, it starts my 22, right?
Staci Garcia:
Yeah. Or you could end your 21, right?
Matthew Maschler:
Well, yeah, I think I should. I probably will end 21 at 21 million. That’s so awesome. 21 and 21. So I might have to brag about that a little bit, but I’m very excited that you got an offer, you got a buyer for your house. That’s kind of what we dream of when we have our open houses that we’re going to find a buyer either for the house that we’re hosting or for another house. So if you’re looking for a good real estate agent and looking for real estate agent who hustles, it’s a good idea to go to open houses because those are the real estate agents that are working as opposed to the real estate agents that are somewhere else, maybe playing.
One of my agents received an offer the other day on the standard contract. It’s called the standard contract, and there’s different types of form contracts in the state of Florida. There’s two contracts that are approved by the Florida Association of Realtors and the Florida Bar Association, and it’s called Far Bar, Florida Association Realtors and the Bar Association. And they have two contracts. One’s the standard contract, one is the As is contract. And in the last 15 years in South Florida, I’ve predominantly seen and used the as is contract. But every once in a while you do see the standard contract. And someone had asked me a question about the differences and I said I would explain it on the show. So the standard contract, which we don’t use, but my partner Jill was saying when she was started in real estate, everyone used it. But the standard contract, one of the things that’s good about it for the realtor’s point of view is that the buyer can’t cancel in the As is contract.
The buyer has an inspection period, usually 3, 7, 10, 15 days, and they can cancel for any reason in that inspection period. But in the standard contract, they can’t. The standard contract, there’s a term usually one and a half percent of the purchase price. And on the inspections, if the house is defective for whatever reason, the seller agrees to either make the repairs or give a credit to the buyer, but it can’t exceed the negotiated amount, which is usually one and a half percent of the contract price. So if you sell a house for a million dollars, $15,000 in repairs, the seller is required to do or to provide a credit. And what’s nice about this type of contract for the seller’s point of view is that the seller knows that the buyer can’t walk, can’t cancel, and the buyer, the buyer’ss agent is also happy because the buyer is in the deal and committed only if the repairs exceed that number, can the buyer either agree to take the property anyway or the seller agree to pay the additional amount.
But if the seller doesn’t agree to pay the additional amount or the buyer doesn’t agree to take the property anyway, then the contract is cancelable. And that’s the standard contract versus the as is contract, which if you’ve bought a house in south Florida, as you probably know, has an inspection period where the buyer can cancel for whatever reason. That being said, sometimes the word as is confusing to both the buyer and to the seller. Generally, the buyer makes the first move, the buyer makes an offer. The seller advertises house for sale, but the buyer makes an offer. And the old adage, the pen is mightier than the sword. The buyer takes that first pen and drafts the first offer. The offer can ultimately once executed, becomes the contract. So the buyer’s in control at the very beginning and makes the first offer. If they use the as is contract, they say that there is a time period if left blank, 10 days that the buyer has to inspect.
And the terms of the inspection, what the buyer is inspecting for is not in the contract. It doesn’t matter if the buyer just has a bad feeling about the house. That’s okay. That’s enough for the buyer to cancel and get his deposit back. And that’s actually something Stacey remind me of. I want to talk about the deposits. Okay. Okay. So the buyer has the inspection period, let’s say seven to 10 days, and they can cancel for any reason. In this highly competitive market, A lot of sellers are accepting backup offers. A lot of buyers, if they lost that bidding war, are trying to submit backup offers. And that way if during the inspection period the buyer demands too much, the seller can refuse those demands knowing that they have a backup offer. And the backup offer is kind of hoping that the seller does so that they can come in and kind of swoop in and swipe the deal.
I never used backup offers before, but in this market in 2021, I’ve been using them successfully. I’ve had three buyers. I managed to buy a property that they were originally lost a bidding war to by using the backup offer. And I’ve had sellers hold tight in the inspections, but I talk about the confusion. It’s not as is in the fact that the seller is saying the properties as is, take it or leave it. That’s never the deal. In that first offer, a lot of times when the buyer makes the request, the seller will say, I thought it was as is. No, it’s only as is. Because what that does is gives the buyer the right to cancel. So the nickname we call it in the industry as is with the right to renegotiate as is with the right to renegotiate. So when the seller gets mad because the buyer made a request, well that’s going to happen.
The buyer’s going to make a request. The seller doesn’t have to accept it. You can negotiate it, and it’s in the buyer’s court. If the buyer doesn’t want to agree to the seller’s response, if seller offers nothing or a nominal amount, the buyer can choose to accept it and move on or get their money back, cancel the contract, no harm, no foul, but it’s not as is when the seller’s thinking as is. I’m selling the house as is. I’m not making any changes. Now, really, in fairness and fairness doesn’t always come up in real estate or the law. What you’re supposed to inspect for and ask for is things you didn’t know. Things that weren’t easily apparent when you inspected the property. So for instance, if there’s a roof leak, well, you didn’t know there was a roof leak. You knew the roof was old, but you didn’t know there was a roof leak.
If there’s no fence around the pool and you want a fence behind the pool, well, is it fair to say to someone, Hey, there’s no fence around the pool? Well, you knew that when you saw the property. So if you knew that when you saw the property, to me it’s out of bounds. It’s not something you want to bring up in the inspections. It has to be something that you didn’t discover. You inspected, you visited the property to see if you wanted to buy it two or three times you saw that the fireplace was completely ruined the entire, every time you pass by it, now you’re asking for a credit. It doesn’t seem right. It doesn’t leave a good taste in the seller’s, in seller’s mouth because for something that was readily apparent, but something you didn’t notice is obviously fair game, right? I offered you $300,000. I didn’t know that the house was filled with termites. I didn’t know that the air conditioners were broken.
Staci Garcia:
And this is all during an inspection period.
Matthew Maschler:
During the inspection period.
Staci Garcia:
Wouldn’t the inspector tell you those things?
Matthew Maschler:
The inspector, right? So when you visited the house, you didn’t know about these defects. You didn’t know that the heater was broken because it was 87 degrees. When you visited the house, you didn’t check the heater. So things you didn’t know, things you didn’t discover. For me, that’s stuff that’s a valid to negotiate. But things that were very, very obvious when you walked in, things that were easily apparent that you ignored, that you knew about and made your offer anyway, I don’t think it’s fair game to bring that up to a seller. When you knew, when you saw the property that there was a big crack in the driveway, right? You saw it. It was right there when you made the offer. See,
Staci Garcia:
I got confused, and not that I outwardly showed it, but I’ve been asked in negotiations after an inspection, when I even heard the inspector tell the buyers and their agent that everything was good, it was solid, great house, blah, blah, blah. And then a couple days later the agent emails and says, I would like this to be looked at. This is a safety issue. Is that a? That made me think, oh, now is there some special rule that now it’s a safety issue?
Matthew Maschler:
Not that I know of. I don’t believe that there’s a safety issue that preempts any other provision of the contract. So if the inspection period’s over, but somebody raises a safety issue on the pool, I don’t think that flies. However, the seller does have the obligation to maintain the property in the same order. So if something was working when you showed it to me and it was working during the inspections and now it’s no longer working, whether it’s a safety issue or not, if it’s no longer working, then it’s something that the seller is legally obligated to address. And that’s why it’s so important to do that final walkthrough. And sometimes people will even want to bring in the inspector, there’s an additional cost, but you might want to bring in an inspector in for that final walkthrough. But you do want to go into the final walkthrough. For me, the final walkthrough was always about make sure the house was still there, make sure nobody was living there, make sure that their stuff was out. Make sure the house didn’t burn down to the ground since the last time you saw it and the property’s vacant and empty and what you expect. But you can check to see if there’s anything, if everything’s working and if something’s not working and it was never working, it’s not the time to bring it up at the walkthrough.
But no, when I lived in New Jersey, and every time anybody, I tell my agents, whenever there’s someone quotes a rule that they made up or you never heard of before, I like to reply with, where in New Jersey are you from? Because in New Jersey, the town will come out and inspect the property and have an issue, a certificate of occupancy, and you cannot close without that certificate of occupancy. So when the town comes out, if there’s a problem with the electrical panel, with the boiler, with broken windows, et cetera, and the town doesn’t issue a certificate of occupancy, the seller is on the hook and the seller needs to make the repairs necessary for that. It took me a long time when I moved to Florida to realize that no one from the city, from the government, from the government, I’m here to help. No one is there to help you.
No one is coming to the house to make sure that it’s safe or that it’s sound or that there wasn’t an illegal conversion. No one is coming to that house to check it out and make sure it’s safe for you. It is. Buyer beware In Florida, if you don’t know if that addition was permitted, you got to go check it out during your inspection period. If you find out later, your SOL all has to be done during the inspection period. So we talked about the FAR bar contract standard and as is, and those are used statewide, but there are other contracts. There is another Florida Realtors contract that I’m not as familiar with. But then there’s also local area associations that may have contracts. We don’t have that here in our area in South Florida, but I know the Naples board, they do have a contract.
I think they have two. They have a version of the standard and a version of the As is Northeast Realtors out of Jacksonville. They have their own contract that they use and that’s all allowed and that’s all. Okay. We use the state approved forms here in South Florida. We don’t our own forms for Palm Beach County. But there’s an interesting thing I want to bring up that people don’t talk about. Realtors are not lawyers. So realtors are not allowed to draft legal agreements and the way the state of Florida, and because I did go to law school and I practice law in New Jersey, I’m admitted to the Florida bar as well. So the way New Jersey handled realtors and the way Florida handled realtors differs a little bit. There’s an issue, realtors aren’t lawyers, they can’t draft contracts, but come on, in the realtors course of the day, they need to be able to use a contract because that’s how people are going to buy or sell real estate through the contract.
So I’m going to give you a brief overview of what the New Jersey Bar did to give realtors some leeway to prepare contracts without committing a misdemeanor of the unauthorized practice of law. And that’s why we have to use these state approved forms because if a realtor drafted their own forms, they’re committing the unauthorized practice of law. So in New Jersey, what they did was the New Jersey Bar said, okay, realtors are allowed to write contracts, but they have to put a provision in that any party, the buyer or the seller can take that contract to an attorney after it’s executed, usually within three days. And if during those three days, the attorney disproves the contract, the contract can be canceled. And when I practice law in New Jersey, the way it went was every contract was immediately canceled by the attorney. Within the attorney review period, this contract would come across my desk and I’d represent the buyer and I’d say, dear Mr.
Seller, I represent the buyer. I’m reviewing this contract and this contract is no good. I’m hereby canceling it. However, if you make the following changes, we can reinstitute the contract. And I had a list of about 20 standard changes. Some were industry standard, some were that I had created from seeing deals fall apart. And then the other side’s lawyer would get involved and we’d negotiate all of the changes and get the contract back together. For that, I was paid the lease sum of about $675 to negotiate the contract inspection credits and get everybody closed at the closing. And one of the reasons why I changed professions, professions or just the side of the table, the seat at the table when I moved to Florida was I was sick of writing realtors $25,000 checks when I was getting sunshine, $75. And I got to Florida and I said, how do I sign up to become a real estate agent?
I would rather do that if I’m going to write contracts and negotiate inspections Anyway, and that’s a little hint of how and why I started becoming a real estate agent. But in Florida, what the Florida Bar did was they said, listen, we’re going to approve these forms. We’re going to make fill in the blank contracts like Mad Libs. And when I used to practice law in the nineties before the internet, you could buy fill in the blank contracts for all sorts of things at the stationary store. And anyone younger than stationary, anyone younger than Florida, best wishes, some of them would have in the back, all the legal forms. And yeah, when I practice law, I would go to the stationary store and buy the legal forms, fill ’em out in my typewriter, but I am old. So Florida said, yeah, realtors can use these approved forms.
And they created the Florida Association Realtors in the Florida bar worked together on two contracts to the standard in the As is which were recently updated. They’re updated every three or four years. They have their leasing forms. And then some of the local areas, Naples and Jacksonville specifically, but I’m sure there are others, have their approved forms. And they say, okay, realtors, you can use these forms. You can embellish a little bit, you can put a couple terms in, but don’t go crazy. Where realtors get in trouble was when they go crazy and they start adding terms and adding terms and adding terms, and they’re making stuff up and it is indecipherable what they’re trying to say or what they’re trying to agree when a realtor tries to pretend they’re a lawyer and over-engineer the forms.
So that’s why we have these stated issued forms to avoid the unauthorized practice of law Jersey and Florida taking a different approach. But when my New Jersey clients come in and the contract’s signed before them, they say, don’t I get a three day attorney review? I have to say, no, this is not New Jersey. You don’t get a three day attorney review. And sometimes they insist on them, and I’ll write in the addendum that, do you get them an attorney? I could recommend an attorney for them. They have to choose and pay for it and pay for it.
And I am an attorney, I’m a licensed attorney, and I’m happy to go over the form with them. I don’t think they need it, but sometimes they insist on writing in that three day attorney review and I’ll write it in the addendum, no problem. But they could also cancel for any reason in the inspection contingency. So they have usually longer, I haven’t seen it in a while, especially in this hot market, people asking for that attorney review. But it is very, very much a New Jersey concept. And when customers come down here and ask for that attorney review immediately I’ll ask them, where in New Jersey are they from? And not in a facetious matter, I’m from New Jersey or I’m from State Island, but I lived in New Jersey long enough and I want to know where they’re from because it’s interesting to me and we’ll have some connections.
But yeah, the Florida as is contract. It’s not as is meaning that the buyer has not agreed to buy it as is. That’s what I have to explain to my seller, my stubborn seller, I thought I was selling it as is. No, the buyer did not agree to buy your property as is the buyer agreed to buy your property and to do an inspection. And as long as everything was what they thought it would be, they’ve agreed to this price. But if they discover things that they did not know, that is now up for negotiation. You don’t have to accept it. You can say no, and it’s in the buyer’s court, and the buyer can then choose if they want to proceed or not. So Mr. Stubborn Seller, it’s not as is to the extent that the buyer didn’t agree to an as is contract. It’s only as is because it’s as is subject to inspections. And Mr. Byer, you didn’t agree to buy it as is. You are perfectly in your rights to ask for something that you didn’t know about and that the inspection uncovered the rat’s nest in the attic. Of course, you didn’t go into the attic when you viewed the house. I have never had a buyer go into the attic when they at a showing
Staci Garcia:
During a regular showing,
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, during a showing. I’ve never had the buyer say, Hey, open up the attic. I want to see what’s up there. But that is what the inspector is. So the buyer did not agree to buy it as is. They bought it, they agreed to buy it as is as presented. However, they’ve reserved the right to cancel or renegotiate if there’s information that they did not know about. So we covered as is. What is as is mean, we covered as is versus standard contract, the unauthorized practice of law. I don’t always take notes, but I know the things I want to talk about in my show. We discovered the practice of law in New Jersey versus Florida. And then any other term that people and customers make up. Generally I blame New Jersey. So a word from our sponsor
Staci Garcia:
Who our sponsor,
Matthew Maschler:
We’re accepting sponsorships here at the Real Estate Finder podcast. I would have the Math Mania podcast be a sponsor, but that might be confusing. For those of you who don’t know, I do do a second podcast, this one that I host with Stacy every week, every Monday, the Real Estate Founder podcast. This is more business, but my personal podcast, the Math Mania podcast, it comes out every Friday and as we get ready for the weekends, we talk about wrestling shows or cruises or rock concerts or whatever I want to talk about that’s not real estate related. It’s a little bit more personal, it’s a little bit sillier, but I enjoy both of my podcasts. And if you want to get ahold of me, you can email me@mattrealestatefinder.com. So Real Estate Finder, the sponsor of the Real Estate Finder podcast, Stacy, your
Staci Garcia:
Stacy with an i@realestatefinder.com. And also www.no HOA boca.com.
Matthew Maschler:
Stacy does not like h HOAs and like-minded customers and like-minded buyers who want to live HOA in a non HOA community, she would be great to find you that community if you want to be in an HOA She’ll help you find a community as well. And I don’t know if people say I want to be in an HOA, but there are people that want to be in a gated community, and usually you can’t have a gated community without an HOA. And then we have some super HOAs here because we have country club communities. So personally, where I live, there’s a mandatory membership country club, and then there’s two HOAs. And I was just reelected to be the secretary of my HOA. It’s just the street I live on. It’s not the entire neighborhood. We had a very good annual meeting the other day, and
Staci Garcia:
I was going to give you applause.
Matthew Maschler:
Oh, thank you. Yeah, I was reelected. The applause button would be, no, I don’t think we have.
Staci Garcia:
How about the hell there?
Matthew Maschler:
This one maybe? No, that’s the dot, dot dot. And it doesn’t stop. It’s like I’m old. And you guys remember Andy Rooney in 60 Minutes? So that’s all I can think of. Now. There’s a creepy clapping, but we don’t have the clapping emoji. It’s not an emoji soundbite here, stop populi the podcast studio in Boca Raton. If you’d like to create your own podcast or join me here in the studio, it doesn’t stop you. Oh, that’s a good idea. Alright, and then we are working on a deal with the Garden Cemetery. I’m trying to get a sponsorship from the Garden Cemetery in the Bo Ratton funeral home soon to be sponsors of the Real Estate Finder podcast, the gardens.com. Ask for Marshall, tell him Matthew sent you.
Staci Garcia:
You didn’t tell Marshall about our promotion that we had talked about fly in, fly by, and
Matthew Maschler:
Well, sometimes the country clubs have the fly and try promotions. This is a fly and die promotion,
Staci Garcia:
Fly by and die.
Matthew Maschler:
No, no. I did not seriously tell them about that promotion. It’s a little crass, but the important thing to know is everybody should be pre-planning. You don’t want to be dealing with these things when you’re in grief and when it’s really needed. It’s a terrible time to have to go through and make all these decisions. So in advance, take some time, go to the Gardens on Military Trail, the gardens.com, tell him Matthew sent you. Do your plans, treat yourself and your loved ones responsibly. And guess that was our first Gardens commercial.
Staci Garcia:
It’s a really great place. You could go there and hang out and get free air condition and read a book. It’s really nice.
Matthew Maschler:
Absolutely. Okay, there’s another question that came up on the screen here that someone wanted me to address about the contract. The As is contract of standard contract as far as deposits in the old days, because if you remember, I said I was old when we would draft an offer, we would attach a check to it with a paperclip, a thousand dollars or $3,000. That binder. That was just a show that you were serious. And I actually liked when we did that because you have these customers and they’re making offers at million dollars, 1,000,005, and you say, okay, well, I am going to need a $5,000 deposit to present with the offer. And they look at you like, what do you mean? And they start checking their pockets and they don’t have any money. They’ve got to go find their checkbook, and there’s going to be a time if this offer is accepted that they’re going to have to close and they’re going to have to pay for it.
So I think the process of getting the checkbook writing out that check, it helps condition the buyer to know that this is real and that this isn’t just something that like, yeah, this guy, I’ll give him a million dollars and they’re not bound to it. I’m going to be doing a lot of work on your behalf. And if you can’t write that one or three or $5,000 binder check. But we used to present that with the offer, with the check attached. But obviously since we email or even text offers nowadays, you can’t actually give that physical check. And in a revision to the contract about 50, 20 years ago, this little checkbox, the initial offer is with accompanies the offer or we’ll be given within three days. So you have to give that binder. Contracts need consideration. They need money. So money has to change hands to create a legally enforceable contract.
So that first offer, whether it’s 1, 3, 5, $10,000, either when the offer is made or within three days. And the other reason why people like to wait three days besides the email is you don’t know if it’s going to be accepted and you might have to do a couple drafts and counters back and forth. And then when it’s accepted, okay, then you take out your checkbook and write that first check. But after that, the initial deposit, there’s a second deposit. And really, I like to think of these combined because I try to time the second deposit to come in after the inspections. If it’s a 10 day inspection period, I’ll have the initial deposit be due in 12 days. So you get the inspection period and as long as the buyer, because if the buyer cancels, they get their money back. So what’s the big deal?
If there’s a lot of money or not? Why would a buyer put up a lot of, if they have the ability to cancel, get their money back if there’s a lot of money, what if there’s trouble getting that money back? But then once the inspections are over, then the real deposit comes in. So I call that second deposit, the real deposit. There’s the initial deposit and then the real deposit. And sometimes you see it, it’s 10% or more. It could be 20%, sometimes it’s 1% or 3%. It really depends on the deal. It depends on what the person’s financing together. That first and second deposit is the deposit that’s being used to hold the property. And unless there’s a reason that the buyer can cancel, whether it’s during the inspection period or the financing period, or the appraisal contingency period after the inspections and after financing, if the seller doesn’t have a reason to cancel, if they don’t have a legal ability to cancel, that money’s at risk. So that’s real money that could be at risk. And if the buyer defaults under the contract, the seller can put in a claim for that deposit. So the sellers generally want a significant amount there. And in 2021, they can, they’re taking off the market, they’re choosing your offer over somebody else’s offer, and they’re entitled to a significant deposit.
It’s also a way to make your offer look better when there are multiple offer situations and you’re trying to, people use escalator clauses to raise their offer. If there’s competing offers, well, there’s other terms that you can put in to make your offer look better. You can make that initial deposit even higher to show you’re serious, but you can make the initial and the second combined deposit to be higher. And that could entice a seller to choose your offer over a different offer. So that’s very important. But one warning I have is don’t confuse those. I see a lot of my agents, especially my newer agents, confusing if there’s a financing, if the buyer is going to buy a million dollar house and they’re going to finance 80%, so they’re putting 20% down, that 20% down, that doesn’t have to be in the initial or the second deposit.
The way that the contract’s written is there’s an initial deposit, second deposit, then there’s how much money that’s being borrowed. And then there’s the balance to close. And that’s how much more money the buyer needs to bring to the closing table on closing day. So if on that million dollar home, if the initial deposit is 5,000, and the second deposit is 25,000, now there’s $30,000. It’s 3% of the million dollar house. The person’s borrowing 80%, that’s 800,000. So the last line, the balance to close would be the one 70, the initial and second deposit being 30 $800,000 from the bank, 8 30, 100 $70,000 left to close. So don’t confuse the deposit with the balance to close, which is the deposit, which is the mortgage, the financing, how much you’re putting down on that house. With the mortgage terms, sometimes there’s two transactions going on in the same contract.
There’s the contract between the buyer and the seller, but then outside of the contract between the buyer and the seller, there’s the deal between the buyer and the bank. And the bank needs to come in for inspections and appraisals. And sometimes the bank’s a little, just like I want to say, the buyers and sellers need to be aware that the bank’s involved. The bank also has to be aware that there’s a seller involved. The bank sometimes just says, ah, just postpone the closing two weeks. Well, no, it’s not that easy. The seller has to agree to postpone the closing two weeks. So it goes both ways. You have to be aware that there’s a buyer involved, a seller involved, and a bank involved. That’s what I want to say about deposits. First and second combined is the deposit after inspection period. And don’t confuse the deposit with the money down on the financing.
And that can all be, I can explain all of that. If you’re making your offer, we can go on a Zoom, and I can explain all of that as we go over our offer. I do like to go on Zoom and review documents with my customers. Everybody moves so fast and tries to text at red lights and drive around. We don’t get together to see each other strategize as much as we used to. And there’s ways to get back into that. But like I said before, I’m old. And some of the things that I do are old fashioned, but they’re done for a reason because they work. So that I think, is everything I wanted to say in this podcast. If you have any ideas or questions, topics that or want to come on to our show, you can find me@realestatefinder.com or on the Facebook, the Real Estate Finder podcast. We have Facebook pages, Facebook groups. We have lots of ways to get ahold of me, Twitter and Instagram. I’m Matthew. So yeah, really, if you want to get ahold of me, you should be able to find me. Matthew Ashler realestate broker realestate finder.com. Realestate Finder podcast.
Staci Garcia:
It’s Stacey Garcia. I’m Stacey Smail. All over. Just look
Matthew Maschler:
For me. Stacey Smail and no, HOA Boca. Yep. Or as Danny Fineman says, just yell out the window. I need the real estate finder. Yep. All right. Thanks for listening, and have a great day.
Speaker 3:
The future looks bright and the stones pass by the sky’s dog. Blue. When it’s almost that time, light shows cameras flash When I pass living in the moment, forget about the past. They say the best for last. Matthew Mania. We about to make a splash. Life is a marathon full of sharp turns, got to keep pace while the hands on the clock turns high stakes. Five star real estate. I run a show. You could tell the boss, center plate, electricity, energy. If I brace, I’m always on time. Even if I’m, I make dreams. Come living life real.
Speaker 4:
You know. Know you know what you know. It’s know. It’s what you know. Time You knows. You know what time.
Speaker 3:
You know what time. You know what time. You know what time whose time? It’s, you know what time. Yeah. Got him shook, scared. Can’t look. We’re not afraid of the big bad wall. First comes to.