Ep. 116 – Social Media Marketing for Realtors with Kelli Brink, Director of Podcast Growth Strategy at PodPopuli

Matthew Maschler:
Welcome to the Real Estate Finder podcast. I’m Matthew Maschler, real estate broker with the signature real estate companies here in the great state of Florida. And with me, the co-host of the Real Estate Finder podcast, Stacey Garcia. Hi, Stacey.
Staci Garcia:
Hi. How are you
Matthew Maschler:
Doing? I’m good. Good. How are you? I’m great. Awesome, awesome. And also in the studio today we have Joe Glanzer. Hi, Jill.
Jill Glanzer:
Hey, Matt.
Matthew Maschler:
It must not be a busy week. You’re not showing any houses today?
Jill Glanzer:
Tomorrow. Tomorrow, but not today. Also, I cleared my schedule for this
Matthew Maschler:
Also right after the podcast.
Jill Glanzer:
Yeah. Well, I am going to see a preview some stuff after the
Matthew Maschler:
Podcast. Right after the, she was like, one of the houses that one of our buyers is interested in is having an open house today. And we were thinking about going in there, just see if we can see the house again. Connect with the agent a little bit because if this buyer, we suspect the buyer actually likes the house, they might want to make an offer. So anything we can learn and any connection we can make with the listing agent will be helpful. But the showing’s not till tomorrow. And then Jill was like, do you want to go to the open house? I’m like, I do. But we have podcasting tomorrow, but I do the second podcast right after this. So Jill’s going to go after the podcast. And then what else do you have? You have inspections this weekend. You’ve been busy.
Jill Glanzer:
Yeah, I’ve been really busy.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. May and June you’ve been
Jill Glanzer:
Yeah. Cranking, working
Matthew Maschler:
Your tail off.
Jill Glanzer:
Absolutely.
Matthew Maschler:
Stacy, you’ve been busy.
Staci Garcia:
I’ve been selling the same house for about three months. You have been selling? I’ve had four buyers.
Matthew Maschler:
Six offers,
Staci Garcia:
Four inspections. It’s
Jill Glanzer:
Been busy
Staci Garcia:
Too. No, actually I have two that are heading to close. Appraisal is Thursday.
Matthew Maschler:
This is interesting about this one on St Cloud. I shouldn’t really say where it is. It’s still an open deal. And someone could look up our listing, our listings. But what’s the listing price?
Staci Garcia:
6 25.
Matthew Maschler:
6 25. And then the range of offers are from where to where?
Staci Garcia:
5 57. Well, actually the first offer was like 5 25.
Matthew Maschler:
5 25. 5 57.
Staci Garcia:
5 57, 6. Now I’m at six 30. Six 30. I’ve gotten unsolicited offers and people calling saying, did you get my offer? People not even telling me they’re sending an offer. People who haven’t seen just like Covid, people that have not seen the property sending me offers. I’m like, wow. It’s like Covid because the price is so
Matthew Maschler:
Low at that price to be in that area. Central Bo Ratone walking distance to the mall.
Staci Garcia:
Single family home, single home, two car
Matthew Maschler:
Garage for 6 25. It’s kind of amazing. And then the house that I bought this way during Covid is under contract. I’m selling it because the numbers don’t work anymore. The value of the house minus the cost of carrying and the cost of maintenance, the rent doesn’t add up. I buy it for during covid
Staci Garcia:
4 31.
Matthew Maschler:
4 31 in
Staci Garcia:
2020.
Matthew Maschler:
2020. It was like June, 2020, right? Yep. So we were full lockdown, body hazmat suits. Only one person in the house allowed at a time.
Staci Garcia:
4, 4, 2, 4 2.
Matthew Maschler:
But it was 4 20, 4 31.
Staci Garcia:
4 31.
Matthew Maschler:
Actually
Staci Garcia:
It was four 20 and we got it to 4 31. It was multiple
Matthew Maschler:
Offers. And I went in over because you had to at that time, and people didn’t know you had to at that time. But I mean, when I say multiple offers, there were 20 offers at least for 420,000. And the house we’re selling for 620,000.
Staci Garcia:
No, it’s seven 40. That’s
Matthew Maschler:
House. Seven 40. Yeah. Why did you say six 20? Six 20 is House Cloud across the street. Yeah,
Staci Garcia:
It was 7 85.
Matthew Maschler:
We listed it for 7 85. First buyer fell through, we removed the staging. So if you remember the staging episode where I said, we definitely got more money because we staged it, definitely. Now the buyer fell through after we moved the staging. Staging
Staci Garcia:
Was so beautiful.
Matthew Maschler:
And so I had to say to myself, okay, do I go $5,000 for staging or do I put it up? We just put it up. Got an offer at seven 40. So did I lose 20,000 by not staging, by not paying 5,000 for staging? I don’t know. But I didn’t want to wait the six weeks that it was going to take to remarket it. So well put it up. Someone got a good deal, they’ll be happy. I’m selling it for seven 40 a property that I bought for 4 1 4 31. And even though I did put some money into it, we had a great roofer. He could recertify the roof for the insurance company. So if anybody needs a good roofer or if the roof’s at the end of the useful life and you have a problem with the insurance company, I got the guy that can extend it two years and give you the right certification to give the insurance companies. I had him do all my houses, so I saved a lot of money on my insurance. And then even though we’ve put some money into the house, it doesn’t count for the rents we collected along the way. In the last three years, they’ve probably gotten over $150,000 in rent. So
Staci Garcia:
I just want to sidetrack for a sec. There’s a house that went up for sale in my neighborhood, same neighborhood down the street, same street. And it went up for sale for 7 85, I think. And on Friday, today was Tuesday. Saturday was being showed. I had a client that wanted to see it Sunday. Sunday. That listing agent texted me and said, I know you have a person that wants to see the house at six o’clock, but the seller thinks that the high demand warrants her raising the price and she’s raising the price to eight 50. And I’m like, what? It’s already listed. I mean, I would do that on the side. I would be offer versus offer. You know what I mean? They would be raising each other. She’s actually going into the MLS and raising. She wants the price now to be over eight 50.
Matthew Maschler:
I’ve done it. I understand
Staci Garcia:
It. It’s just not a good thing in my
Matthew Maschler:
Book. And especially, it’s from a strategy point of view. What was it listed for?
Staci Garcia:
It was 7 79, same as ours. So
Matthew Maschler:
It’s listed for seven 80, but they won eight 50 in 2022 and 2023 when things were hot, you could get it. You list it that way to chum the water. And then you get all those. You get all those offers. But yeah, she wants to do it that way, and that’s fine.
Staci Garcia:
They also lowered their rental price. They had it for 55 something, now it’s 52 50. Did
Jill Glanzer:
She get any purchase offers?
Staci Garcia:
I don’t know because I’m not her listing agent, but he said to me, I apologize, and I never do this, but my seller wants to raise the price before you come here at six. And would that be a problem? Does your buyer still want it? Buy it at eight 50 or whatever. And I asked him and he was like, hell no, because he really wanted to be a backup offer for our listing. So as I have him as a backup for our listing, this is a not,
Matthew Maschler:
Sometimes it’s the price that drives you to the house. If you’re looking in a particular neighborhood like the one on St. Cloud, oh, at that price, let me go now. I’m interested in the house. It’s not like I saw the house. I fell in love with it. So it might work for this seller, but they might get stuck.
Jill Glanzer:
To me. It’s one thing if they got a bunch of low price offers and then they raised it, but if they’ve got no offers, it’s weird. But
Staci Garcia:
Who knows? I’m guessing that the people that came were a lot of volume because there was a lot of volume to my listings as well. So she probably saw the amount of people that were coming and said, well, you know what? There’s high demand. We should raise the price. I
Matthew Maschler:
Had 30 showings on one of my listings, the other a couple of weeks ago that resulted in zero offers. Oh, yep. So how do you read that? Is it high demand or are people just shopping? People are
Staci Garcia:
Bored,
Matthew Maschler:
Right? It’s not, they’re bored. They’re in the market. They’re shopping and they’re excluding choices. So the one that’s in demand going to eight 50, that’s in the same neighborhood, same street. So these are buyers who are looking at St. Cloud, looking at University Park and saying, oh, here’s another one for sale. Let me look at it. I always like to look at a few more of, once I’ve made my mind, whether it’s women or houses, I always want to
Staci Garcia:
Check out the
Matthew Maschler:
All right, just in case. Let me just check out, see, see what’s left on the shelf real quick before I bring it to the register.
Staci Garcia:
Check out the lineup at the bar before you go home.
Matthew Maschler:
Exactly. Exactly. So we have another person in the studios. When I started the podcast, it was audio only. So I can come in pajamas, play my phone. It didn’t really matter. Now the studio, pod popularized studios. Studios nationwide if you want to start a podcast, but now they have all these cameras and stuff. So I have to wear nicer clothes, I guess. I don’t know.
Staci Garcia:
I’m still in pajamas. I
Matthew Maschler:
Think I’m still in pajamas too. Joe’s always dressed professional. So we have all these cameras. So we have a fourth person in the studio who hasn’t spoken to anyone who’s watching on the cameras. Kelly, do we have the show? Is it on YouTube?
Kelli Brink:
It is. We put smaller chunks of, not the full episodes.
Matthew Maschler:
We don’t do full episodes. No.
Kelli Brink:
Just shorts and things like that
Matthew Maschler:
When it was audio. Only do some people when it was audio only. And my podcast is on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, iHeart. Do people drop audio only on YouTube?
Kelli Brink:
Well, you can’t do audio only, but what people do is put the logo and then the audio. But a lot of
Matthew Maschler:
People do that. A picture of me in 45 minutes of me talking about
Kelli Brink:
Real estate. Yes, just like that. We try not to do the full episodes of that because we want more people to go to the podcast and sign up and sign up, subscribe, have those download numbers. Count. But then
Matthew Maschler:
They can go to the YouTube channel. But
Kelli Brink:
You do want to be social media famous, so you’ll take whatever you get. Right?
Matthew Maschler:
I hired Kelly. I told her, make me insta famous. Make me social famous.
Kelli Brink:
We’re working on it. Alright,
Matthew Maschler:
So let’s talk about Kelly. Kelly Brink.
Kelli Brink:
Awesome. Hello,
Matthew Maschler:
The director of Social Media for the Real Estate Finder and Matthew Mania podcast.
Kelli Brink:
Yes. Love it. Yep. And director of podcast growth strategy for Pod Populi Media too.
Matthew Maschler:
Director of Podcast Growth Strategy, correct? Yes. So Kelly was in town last week. She had a seminar back in May at the end of May. What was the seminar? It was
Kelli Brink:
Was a social media workshop for podcasters who want to take their social media kind of to the next level and step it up a little bit. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
Unlock the power of social media for your podcast. Join Kelly Brink, director of podcast growth at Pod Popular Life for a small group workshop, discussing the power of social media and maximizing your podcast visibility. How’d it go?
Kelli Brink:
It went well. We had six podcasters come in. So it was a small group, which was actually really nice. We just sat on the couches. We all had just a really good conversation, exchanged ideas. We had a variety of people, people who use a variety of platforms because there’s so many, and it’s good to do a little bit of everything, but it’s also good to do one thing. Well, I
Matthew Maschler:
Think when you say there’s so many platforms. Yeah, I’ve been podcasting since 2021, and I don’t know what that means. I just come in here and they put a microphone. I just sit down and I just talk. So what do you mean? There’s so many, there’s different
Kelli Brink:
Platforms. So many social media platforms. Social
Matthew Maschler:
Media
Kelli Brink:
Platforms. Yeah. So there’s Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, YouTube, shorts, Twitter, which is X. Now, I still call it Twitter. There’s so many. I don’t
Matthew Maschler:
Like Googling X.
Kelli Brink:
You don’t like Googling X. Some weird stuff comes up, doesn’t it? Everything
Matthew Maschler:
From the subject. If I want to see the subject, Donald Trump trial X, and then you get an X version of the search,
Kelli Brink:
Everything from X rated to X to see the drug. I mean, you never know what you’re going to get.
Matthew Maschler:
Whereas, whereas Twitter is at least a word, even if it’s a made up word. Exactly. At least it’s a word that can direct me in the right place.
Kelli Brink:
I don’t think Elon was thinking ahead very well with his strategy there.
Matthew Maschler:
He had to have been
Kelli Brink:
Right? Because he’s so intelligent,
Matthew Maschler:
Intelligent and spend so much money, he can’t say he wasn’t thinking. He probably thought it and then dismissed this, right?
Staci Garcia:
He overthought it,
Matthew Maschler:
I think. I’m sure he thought about it, right? But
Kelli Brink:
So many reasons why I just, that name just doesn’t work for people still are like, I can’t call it X, I just still want to call it Twitter. So it’s not
Matthew Maschler:
Easiest. And when I first read it, my assumption was that he was just going to rename the company X
And still have the product Twitter, but X, the company X is good. X is a variable. So if he has a company and he called his company X, he could have multiple products. Twitter could be a product, Tesla could be a product. The solar roofs could be a product, whatever he wants to do in his space X, it could all be a product just like meta or Alphabet. Alphabet owns Google. Alphabet’s the company. Google is the product. Meta is the company. Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, I think Yes, are the products of Meta. So when I first read it, that’s what I thought, but changing the product name from Twitter to X is like meh.
Kelli Brink:
It’s like changing Kleenex to something totally different. We know the word Twitter, we’ve come to, it’s part of our lives. Every day we changed the name. It’s been weird for people.
Matthew Maschler:
And we know he likes X. He has SpaceX and Tesla was the Model X. That was my, so I got it that way.
Staci Garcia:
It’s going to make perfect sense. One day he have a kid out of 20 kids, doesn’t have a kid with a weird symbol,
Kelli Brink:
Like a print symbol. Yes.
Matthew Maschler:
But yeah, when you have that much money, you’re not crazy. You’re eccentric,
Kelli Brink:
Right? That’s right. That’s right. We’ll say that. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
So yeah, I would come in here for years. I would come, I’d talk on the microphone. But then let me ask, you started as a producer of podcasts.
Kelli Brink:
Yes. So yeah,
Matthew Maschler:
What does a producer of podcasts do?
Kelli Brink:
Oh, everything behind the scenes from content, the whole masterminding, the whole idea of the podcast, creating the podcast, branding the podcast, organizing all the editors and the social media people, just all the stuff. Kind of the general contractor of a construction project is what the producer of a podcast does behind the scenes.
Matthew Maschler:
So when I started the podcast, I had a lot of help from pod populi. I obviously couldn’t do it without pod populi, and they have everything I need, the equipment and the studio, and what to do with the tape, right? Once I record it, what to do with it. So all I have to do is come in here and think about what I’m going to say and what I’m going to title the podcast. But I don’t have a producer or part of me wishes could start over. Alright, can you just pretend I’m brand new? Because what’s going on? I still don’t know because I still don’t know stuff. Yeah, it’s magical. There’s a person behind the curtain. And then the only thing I know about producers is what I see on tv. If I watch Frazier or Frazier had a producer, or if I watch any of these other shows, they all producer stuff. Yes.
Kelli Brink:
So that’s what I did on a couple different shows. But yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. And how do you make money being a producer? Does the podcast pay you?
Kelli Brink:
So yes, the podcast paid me. Then advertising dollars, there’d be a split of that. Patreon, things like that. Money comes from a lot of places in a podcast. So
Matthew Maschler:
What I’m saying is the podcast host. Yes. Right? Yes. Maybe who owns a podcast, right? The podcast host. The person who’s branding the podcast are either that person is paying you. I was going to say he, but I also be gender neutral. So either that person’s paying you or your partners with them.
Kelli Brink:
Yes, exactly. So I worked on, well, my first show I produced as a, so, okay, we’ll go back seven years. I’ve been in podcasting for seven years. I started in true crime. I have a background in radio and communications, and I was just a podcast binger. I loved listening to True Crime podcasts. And one day I was like, I’m going to start my own podcast. So I started my own and I did everything for my own. And then I got hired to work on a show called Truth and Justice with Bob Ruff. That was the first show I was a producer for. And it’s a really big show. Bob is a documentarian. He’s been doing it for 12 years. So he’s making really good money on his podcast. So yes, was like, he paid the bills. He had a whole staff of people working on his podcast. We had editors, producers, just all sorts of people.
Matthew Maschler:
And I imagine when you go into any business, you have to have goals. Most businesses, the goal is to make money. I imagine the goal of a podcast is to make money.
Kelli Brink:
Not for everybody. Not for
Matthew Maschler:
Everybody. I didn’t even think about making money on online, and now I’m sitting here, I’m like, it
Kelli Brink:
Would nice. Two, three.
Matthew Maschler:
So bringing you on, not as the producer, but as director of social media. Maybe we could talk about can I make money on this podcast? Yes.
Kelli Brink:
Every podcast can make money. And we have sometimes in podcasting, people have a really big goal. They think they have to be like Joe Rogan level to make money, but that is not true at all. I go by the thousand true Fans theory, if you’ve heard of that, get a thousand people to just rave about you. Love you, eat up every single thing you put out there. Buy a T-shirt. If you can get a thousand people to spend a hundred dollars a year, you’re making a hundred thousand dollars from your podcast. And that’s not that hard. Think of bands you like, things you’re loyal to. You’d buy the T-shirt, you’d buy the concert ticket. You’d buy the digital download. Yeah. That’s kind of how I think of it.
Matthew Maschler:
So in making money on a podcast, especially for mine, like a local podcast, not a famous or so person, even though I hired you to make me, it’s the famous Yes, yes. Is it the type of thing where I go and look for sponsors, find local businesses and restaurants that might want to sponsor, create a commercial and put them on my podcast? Or is it the type of thing where Google and Facebook, where if you get enough volume, they just pay you automatically?
Kelli Brink:
All of that. All of that. I think if you have a good relationship with a local business or even other real estate agents or anybody who really believes in you, I always say make a one pager that tells about the show some of the stats, what you’re bringing to the table, and you don’t have to have huge numbers. You’re really selling yourself more than the podcast. Do people believe in you? They, they’ll be like, I’ll throw a hundred dollars a week to sponsor you, and you put a little ad in. So I think go to the people that are in your network before you go to some big advertising company that’s for smaller podcasters. I think that’s a good way to go about it. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
Didn’t want to. When I first started here at PopPop, some of the podcasts that I would listen to had sponsors, just random commercials that would interrupt up the podcast. I didn’t like listening to those podcasts.
Kelli Brink:
Yes, skip ahead.
Matthew Maschler:
Because it was,
Kelli Brink:
Yeah, it’s distracting. Distracting. You’re listening to good content. You don’t want that interrupted with an ad.
Matthew Maschler:
And professional radio shows like Howard Stern or the Ben Shapiro podcast, they do their own in their voice. They do the commercial, which I think is less distracting.
Kelli Brink:
It’s called a baked in ad. That’s what we call it in the industry. There’s baked in ads, dynamic insertion ads, all kinds of ads. But yeah, advertisers really like it when people read those, it
Matthew Maschler:
More personal in their own voice. And I gave up on the idea of doing that because I didn’t have a producer.
Kelli Brink:
Yeah.
Staci Garcia:
We were doing, it kind of weren’t you talking about certain places and
Matthew Maschler:
Stuff? I thought I got an ad from the gardens, and I said, okay, can you just drop this in after every episode? But I never got consistent is something I want to talk about with you since you’re in town. Yes. I want to talk about not on the radio. Yeah, just consistency. The way the descriptions are on my show, they don’t always come in. So I couldn’t get everything I wanted done in the consistency with the intro music. I think the intro music’s wrong. Really?
Kelli Brink:
Oh, okay. You want something a little more
Matthew Maschler:
Upbeat? I mean, it is been years, but I think we’re using the Matthew Mania entrance music on the real estate funder podcast. Oh, okay. But I just gave up. But again, all these little things and that I gave up on. But Jill
Staci Garcia:
And I can do a wrap, a house wrap. Oh,
Kelli Brink:
Yes. You guys could sing. Do a little. Oh yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
But I was having trouble with consistency at the beginning and the end of the podcast and other things that I just kind gave up on, and I was just coming and talking and see what happens. So
Kelli Brink:
We will address all of that while I’m in town. Yeah, we’ll do that. That’s awesome. Where do you live? So I live in Iowa, but Iowa. Have you ever met anyone from Iowa?
Staci Garcia:
My best follow, yeah. My best friend’s son goes to University of Iowa. Oh,
Kelli Brink:
Okay. Yeah. That’s where I went to school too, for communications. But I have for years now, been traveling a lot for working in podcasting. I mean, I don’t have a single client in Iowa. They’re all over the country. So I am going to be in Florida a lot. Scottsdale, Arizona. I used to have to go to New York a lot, so I say I’m from Iowa, but I’m kind of a nomad.
Matthew Maschler:
Before you joined PopPop, were you traveling that much?
Kelli Brink:
Yeah, I was, because I would do lots of, well, lots of true crime conventions. I did, and then I did live shows with other podcasters. We did tours. We used to book a lot of shows in breweries, and we’d tour every once in a while. It would be a panel of me and five podcasters talking about true crime cases, and we’d sell tickets to live shows and do a lot of fun stuff like
Matthew Maschler:
That. My daughter’s really into conspiracy theories.
Kelli Brink:
Oh, they’re fun. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
So when you say true crime, obviously I automatically dismiss conspiracy theory as untrue as fiction. But then again, people who believe in conspiracy theories think they’re true. Yes. So does conspiracy theory podcasts fit in with True Crime podcast?
Kelli Brink:
Yeah, I think all the spooky stuff falls into one umbrella, like true crime, paranormal conspiracy theories, a little bit of science fictiony stuff out there. People who true crime tend to all the spooky things.
Matthew Maschler:
And from a branding point of view, when I hear true crime, and I feel like I know that, I believe that. But when I hear true crime, I think, okay, the paranormal, the conspiracy theory, this other stuff isn’t going to fit with true crime because it’s not true. But that’s not the point of true crime. The point of true crime is it’s not that it’s true crime, it’s not fiction. It’s not James Patterson and John Grisham and fiction crime. So when someone talks about conspiracy theory, they’re basing it on true events or true theories, and that’s what makes it not utter fiction. Exactly. So we’re not talking about fantasy. We’re not talking about Tolkien, and we’re not talking about law and order. Right? Yeah, exactly. I watch a lot of law and order. That’s not true crime,
Kelli Brink:
But a lot of it is like law and order. SVU usually based on a story that’s ripped from the headlines every week. And that’s what loosely based. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
Otherwise, you can’t make, if you’re a writer, you’re going to run out of waste of murder. Someone every week. Every week. I joke around about Hawaii. My daughter’s friend is from Hawaii, and I’m like, no, I’m scared to go to Hawaii. People are like, why are you scared to go to Hawaii? I watch Hawaii five Oh and Mag Pi.
Jill Glanzer:
Right?
Kelli Brink:
Just crimes happening every day. Everywhere. Everywhere.
Matthew Maschler:
Now I can go to New York. I watch Law and Order and SVU and criminal Intent. I see murder, rape, all this stuff in New York all the time. I’m not scared to go to New York. It’s just a volume. But I look at Hawaii and it’s constantly kidnapping and explosions and murders and missing people between Magnum, PI and Hawaii. Five. Oh, it is a small island. It’s not a huge population. It’s always in the same neighborhood, right? I mean, it’s on every island. That’s so funny. It’s mostly in Honolulu. So I’m scared to go to Hawaii. It looks not nice, but you go on a hike, someone’s going over there, that cliff.
Kelli Brink:
Oh yeah. A hike or just a peaceful cabin in the woods. You know there’s going to be a murder there. No, I’m just kidding. Not really.
Matthew Maschler:
Lots of people with guns, at least with law and order, you don’t see that many machine guns. Yeah. Hawaii is loaded with machine guns. It’s like the A team, at
Kelli Brink:
Least on tv. Anyway, it’s
Matthew Maschler:
Crazy. So I do not want to go to Hawaii. I walk into the bank and all this 15 guys are going to run it and run it every time there’s a bank robbery. Oh my gosh. How do they function then? I love it. So yeah, so true crime being not completely fictionalized based on having that kernel of truth, which is why paranormal and conspiracy theories fit in.
Kelli Brink:
And I think with true crime, let’s say there was some mass murder in a house. This is such a dark subject by the way. It breeds those paranormal stories. Like, oh, this crime happened here. So there must be ghost stories that linger. So it kind of intermingles. Yes. Yeah.
Jill Glanzer:
There was a good real estate slash crime. Yes. Murder house flip. Yes. Did you watch it? I’ve seen. Oh, geez. It freaked me out. Amazing. Real murders. Yeah. So it was a real show. People lived in these homes where famous murders happened, and they were living there, and then they got somebody to come in and kind of redo the space, like a flip. But they would lift up the carpets and there would still be blood from that crime from like five years ago there they’d test for DNA, but then they would make, there was one house. It was horrific. There were bodies stacked up in the master bedroom at one point. That was their master bedroom. They were sleeping in there every night. They lived there, and there were bodies buried all around the house that they had to dig up and throw away and get rid of. Oh my gosh. And their children would come, their grandchildren would come and play there with the bodies. No, the bodies were already gone, but they had been there at one point. Right. So they made the space really pretty so that their kids could play. I’m like, when your grandchildren get old enough and see this episode, they’re going to be like, what? That’s why
Staci Garcia:
I have therapy. Thanks,
Matthew Maschler:
Grandma. You’re not saying that at one point people lived there where there were bodies stacked around? No.
Jill Glanzer:
At one point this woman had murdered a bunch of people and in their master bedroom that is now, there were once bodies in there. But did the
Matthew Maschler:
Lady live there?
Jill Glanzer:
The lady lived there. She murdered them all.
Matthew Maschler:
She murdered them and stacked them up in her bedroom. The
Jill Glanzer:
New lady?
Matthew Maschler:
The
Jill Glanzer:
Murderer. The murderer, yes.
Matthew Maschler:
Did the murderer just live there among the dead bodies? Yeah.
Jill Glanzer:
I don’t understand it. Most of them do, but she buried ’em too.
Matthew Maschler:
Most murderers live among the dead bodies.
Staci Garcia:
They’re trophy
Kelli Brink:
Pieces. They do that. No, you take
Matthew Maschler:
A little hair or tooth or something. You don’t think all bodies. It flips me out. I was just in Alaska on vacation day. People have their boost in their ghost.
Jill Glanzer:
Oh, taxidermy. Taxidermy.
Matthew Maschler:
They have polar bears and stuff like that. But they don’t taxidermy the people.
Kelli Brink:
No.
Jill Glanzer:
There’s someone who does.
Kelli Brink:
Yeah, serial killers do. How about John Wayne Gacy? People like that who, yeah. I’m fascinated by the real estate aspect of this though. Because there are laws, right? That you have to disclose murders and things like that, or no, really? No.
Matthew Maschler:
You do not have to disclose a death in a house.
Kelli Brink:
Okay.
Matthew Maschler:
Death in a house is normal.
Kelli Brink:
Okay. That’s true.
Matthew Maschler:
For a very long time, people died peacefully and sleep,
Jill Glanzer:
You just passed away.
Matthew Maschler:
And Florida’s a relatively new state, but I lived in New York, New Jersey, right? In the 18 hundreds, 19 hundreds, people pass away in their sleep. Or if you were sick, you recovered in your house, people pass away. So there’s no law in Florida if a death or murder,
Kelli Brink:
Suicide or a suicide, you have to say, you don’t have
Matthew Maschler:
To do anything. It doesn’t attach with the house. It doesn’t run with the house. It’s not a disclosable thing.
Jill Glanzer:
But
Staci Garcia:
There’s a website
Jill Glanzer:
For it about
Kelli Brink:
Ghosts.
Jill Glanzer:
But here’s the thing though, if it materially affects the value of the property, you may have to disclose it. If it’s like a famous murder that happened, and it’s been like 10 years, but this person is going to move in and there’s going to be an issue. The
Matthew Maschler:
Classic example of that is in Long Island, the Amityville Horror House.
Jill Glanzer:
Yes, I’ve
Matthew Maschler:
Seen that house, but I don’t even think if you’re in Florida and you kill your wife, you kill your husband. It’s on all the news, and it’s super famous. I don’t think it’s it. I don’t think it’s a material defect of the house.
Jill Glanzer:
I know. But if two years later, that person moved in and their neighbor told them, and then all of a sudden everybody’s telling them, and now they can’t sell the house, could they say, you never disclosed it to me? I don’t know. I don’t know.
Matthew Maschler:
I know
Jill Glanzer:
That
Matthew Maschler:
Sounds feasible.
Kelli Brink:
I don’t think so. And then you have the whole thing with dark tourism too. And take the JonBenet Ramsey house in Boulder, Colorado. Now that street is just so busy with people who want to drive
Jill Glanzer:
By and
Kelli Brink:
Take pictures. They want to get in through the gate. That’s kind of something I would think you might have to,
Staci Garcia:
I would think that would be the case, too, where the gloves were for oj,
Jill Glanzer:
Because now it’s like you’re living in a house where people are driving by all the time, and you have no privacy.
Kelli Brink:
And you may not have known that before you bought the house, and if you would’ve known it. So I wonder sometimes if that could come back on the
Jill Glanzer:
Seller. So there used to be a website died in house.com. It’s not there anymore, where you could actually type in the address and they would do a search. I used to use it. I have a thing with this, and it was amazing. It doesn’t exist anymore. There’s probably someone who could do it, but they just searched public records and found death certificates or news articles about someone dying. I was going to rent a house in a neighborhood here in Boca, and I was super close to renting it, but something told me, you cannot live here. So
Kelli Brink:
It is like this ghosty paranormal thing.
Jill Glanzer:
Yes. I’m super into this.
Kelli Brink:
So I know they don’t have to disclose if someone has died, but what if there’s paranormal activity? I’ve heard that. No. Okay. No,
Jill Glanzer:
It
Matthew Maschler:
Doesn’t
Kelli Brink:
Exist. I know, I know. That’s
Matthew Maschler:
What I think. From a legal point of view, there’s no such thing as ghosts. Yes. So if the house is haunted and there’s 15 ghosts, and for a fact that there’s 15 ghosts in there, and you have your ghost scanner and you can prove, and you can prove that there’s ghosts in there, I still don’t have to disclose because from a legal standpoint, no.
Kelli Brink:
Okay. I’ve heard that you have to do that. I didn’t know.
Jill Glanzer:
It might be in other states, but not here.
Kelli Brink:
Okay, that’s good. No ghost
Matthew Maschler:
Laws. But as far as when you’re talking about tourism, for a long time, people requested the room at the Hard Rock that Anna Nicole Smith
Jill Glanzer:
Died in. She OD’ed or something? Yeah,
Matthew Maschler:
She OD’ed in the Hard Rock. So people used to request that room. I know when I went to California in San Jose, there was an old, the Augustus or Dolphin Hotel that was supposedly haunted, and people requested the specific room that was haunted. But
Kelli Brink:
People love dark stuff.
Jill Glanzer:
They just do. There’s new Eat it up.
Matthew Maschler:
New Orleans Ghost tours.
Kelli Brink:
Yes. I do a ghost tour in almost every town. Go every
Jill Glanzer:
Town
Kelli Brink:
Attend
Matthew Maschler:
The
Kelli Brink:
Ghost. Yeah. I don’t host, actually, I have host every Halloween, there’s this house in Iowa, maybe you’ve heard of it, the ska ax murder house. So in 1912, a whole family was bludgeoned to death was an ax. It’s a really horrible story, but you can rent the house. Is that
Jill Glanzer:
A really huge house on the corner?
Kelli Brink:
It’s on the corner. It’s like an old house. It’s not that big, but it’s actually really cute. So some people bought it, fixed it up. I’ve heard about that. Yeah. You rent it out. I mean, there have been movies about this story. Lots of books written about this story. It’s really famous murder case, but kind of another thing, how real estate has gone trickled over into true crime. So yeah, you can rent the house. They make a lot of money doing that.
Jill Glanzer:
Yeah, they’re smart, right? Yeah.
Kelli Brink:
Yeah. I think so. Yeah. Buying those pieces of property where something crazy happened, you can turn that into a whole business.
Jill Glanzer:
You really could. As long as you’re not the city of Boca. I might not be able to sleep ever, but No,
Matthew Maschler:
No. Where’s a close? If I wanted to go on a ghost tour tonight or this week, obviously, I don’t think there’s tours of Boca,
Jill Glanzer:
Maybe Miami.
Kelli Brink:
Oh, at that? Do you think
Jill Glanzer:
That’s the
Matthew Maschler:
Closest
Jill Glanzer:
Though?
Kelli Brink:
All the
Jill Glanzer:
Palm Beach island? Maybe that’s what I’m saying.
Matthew Maschler:
Palm Beach. Loaded up Palm
Jill Glanzer:
Island. Oh, I’m sure there’s many. Where many,
Kelli Brink:
There’s got to be a Boca. I’m sure there’s got to be some pirates or something. I dunno. There’s some lore over near the
Jill Glanzer:
Sanctuary that there was an Indian burial ground at one point.
Matthew Maschler:
Indian burial Ground is the airport space. Oh, also probably some of FAU.
Kelli Brink:
Okay. If you Google it, I’ve found that every city has a ghost store. Something.
Matthew Maschler:
I know the person who has it all in their head that could give the ghost store.
Kelli Brink:
Who
Matthew Maschler:
You No. No. Okay. No, I have to talk about it off air. But he doesn’t have a ghost store. He
Kelli Brink:
Just has, he just knows all
Matthew Maschler:
He has. He just has the conspiracy theories and the Boca knowledge. Stacey knows what it’s,
Kelli Brink:
I’ve done it in Savannah, Georgia, new Orleans, all these places. So yeah. Well, you can find it. It’ll be on the Google somewhere.
Matthew Maschler:
I was in, was Alaska for my family’s
Kelli Brink:
Vacation. Yeah, that’s on my bucket list. Is it? Was it a cruise?
Matthew Maschler:
No, no. LAN tour. We went up to Mount McKinley. Awesome. Which, by the way, hasn’t been called Mount McKinley since 1979.
Kelli Brink:
What is it
Matthew Maschler:
Called? Denali.
Kelli Brink:
Oh, I knew that. Okay.
Matthew Maschler:
Yes. I think almost everyone knows it at this point. It, it’s not one of those things where there was like, alright, there’s a colonial name and then the native name. But it was interesting to talk about it because no one in Alaska ever knew it was called Mount McKinley. Really?
Kelli Brink:
Okay. Just always Denali.
Matthew Maschler:
It was just always Denali to them. So even, I’m not talking about the native people, even the Americans who came in, but in the US newspapers and Washington DC and stuff, they called them Mount McKinley, but nobody ever told them. Then when they started opening up Mount McKinley Visitor Centers, everybody was like, what the hell is this? So there are still places called restaurants and stuff called McKinley, but it was always Denali up there. Very cool. But in Anchorage, there was a ghost store. Did you go to it? I didn’t. Sometimes when you go to the hotel and there’s all those brochures, but sometimes in advance it’s so hard to get that information. Right.
Kelli Brink:
Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
I want to call the hotel and say, can you go over to the brochure rack? And they send me all the brochures, took a little video, and I always take ’em for next time.
Kelli Brink:
Yes, same.
Matthew Maschler:
And I probably could have, at one point, I could have, there were two nights in Anchorage. I could have done it had I known about it. Yeah.
Kelli Brink:
Did you see any whales, or is it that time of year
Matthew Maschler:
Didn’t see whales? There was someone there. The beluga were just coming in. The big ones weren’t in yet. I definitely saw Bear. I definitely saw Moose. Big goats with big horns.
Kelli Brink:
Oh, like mountain goats?
Matthew Maschler:
They were called D sheep. DAL Sheep.
Kelli Brink:
Oh, cool.
Matthew Maschler:
Okay. I saw all kinds of stuff. Yeah. But yeah, it was pretty amazing. But no ghosts.
Kelli Brink:
No ghosts. How about the Northern Lights? Could you see those? Or is that a certain time of year?
Matthew Maschler:
You really want to go in winter if you want to see Northern Lights, because sun didn’t set till about 1130 at Oh, wow. Really? And then it came up around three 30 or four. Yeah,
Jill Glanzer:
It’s pretty light most of the time.
Matthew Maschler:
Sleep. The first few nights I couldn’t go to sleep. We landed in Anchorage. It’s 10 o’clock, 11 o’clock at night, perfectly daylight. The sun. You see the sun in the sky setting. So let’s say it’s at nine o’clock. Yeah, but it doesn’t fall. It doesn’t go down. So
Kelli Brink:
Weird.
Matthew Maschler:
I’m saying nine o’clock, like on o clock, right? Yeah. So it’s up in the 90 degree angle from your shoulder. But no, so what I eventually realized that in order to go to sleep, you had to close all the blinds.
Jill Glanzer:
Blackout blinds. Yeah. The blackout have to,
Kelli Brink:
I’m on TV that they have to
Matthew Maschler:
Do that. Yeah. So Northern Lights, you really want to see in the winter. However,
Jill Glanzer:
They’re coming to Florida
Matthew Maschler:
June 6th again, a couple of weeks ago when they were visible in the south. Really? Yeah. June 6th. It should be visible again.
Jill Glanzer:
There’s a conspiracy around that too. Around the northern, could you around the fake ones that are supposedly here, but we can talk about
Kelli Brink:
That. Could you see them? When they were just here a few weeks ago?
Matthew Maschler:
I was in Vermont at the time, and I couldn’t see them, but I was just standing up in the parking lot looking at the sky like an idiot. Supposedly people could see them, but only through their camera lens.
Kelli Brink:
Yes. So in Iowa, we could see them really well, and it was like,
Matthew Maschler:
Oh, that one day, those
Kelli Brink:
Two days. And I am such a nerd about all these kinds of things. I love space, meteor showers, all this stuff. So I made my whole weekend revolved around seeing the northern whites and lights. That’s awesome. And my kids and I, we kind of made a little camping thing in the back of my Jeep, and we hung out and just watched the Northern Lights. Awesome. It was really cool.
Matthew Maschler:
All right. Well, thank you for joining us on the podcast. Welcome. I think we have a lot of work to do. I wrote a lot of notes.
Kelli Brink:
Thank you for having me. This has been great. I see you guys every week, so I’m so excited to meet you in person. Yes. It’s awesome.
Matthew Maschler:
The last thought I’ll leave you with is once we started, my daughter took one of the posts that you had made it to Mima and her brother and said, dad’s an influencer.
Kelli Brink:
Oh, I love that. Was it the one with the suit? And I was like, make him Insta famous. So everybody needs, if they don’t follow you on Instagram, they
Matthew Maschler:
At Matthew Ashler. I don’t have an Instagram branded for the real estate company or the real estate podcast. It’s
Kelli Brink:
Just all you,
Matthew Maschler:
Should I just leave it at Matthew Ashler, or should I
Kelli Brink:
We’ll talk about that. Is
Jill Glanzer:
It Matthew h Ashler or It’s just Matthew Ash. Okay.
Matthew Maschler:
I can’t on x, I have both Matthew Ashler and Matt Ashler. That’s another thing I want to talk about. I don’t know which one to use. Okay.
Kelli Brink:
It’s so hard to
Matthew Maschler:
Know. And I’ll tell you the reason why I have that. On X, I had two, I had Matthew Ashler or Matt Ashler. I don’t remember which one. I had had one of them, and I had an account realtor in Boca. Oh,
Kelli Brink:
Okay.
Matthew Maschler:
And I had a lot of success at the beginning of Twitter, when Twitter was really big. I had a lot of success with realtor in Boca. Unfortunately, realtor is a trademarked word owned by the National Association of Realtors. It’s a little
Kelli Brink:
Thing on the
Matthew Maschler:
End, and I wasn’t allowed to use it in that capacity. That’s too bad. So I couldn’t use the realtor in Boca website or realtor in Boca name.
Kelli Brink:
That’s too
Staci Garcia:
Bad. That does mess me up, too. I try to tag you when I automatically go to that in my head. And then I’m like, that’s not you anymore.
Kelli Brink:
Realtor in Boca. Those are great key words for anyone looking for a realtor in Boca. Exactly. So yeah, that would’ve been great.
Matthew Maschler:
I think I can use realtor bachelor or realtor Matthew Bachelor. I think that’s a allowed.
Kelli Brink:
Oh,
Matthew Maschler:
Okay. But then again, you’re allowed to use they now they’re selling them domains. Realtor. Okay. Then you can use almost, but I don’t know what you’re allowed to use in the middle. I dunno. Anyway,
Kelli Brink:
Yeah. Anyway. Yeah, it was great. Kelly,
Staci Garcia:
What’s your Instagram?
Kelli Brink:
Oh yeah. Oh, mine is at Kelly Brink. And it’s Kelly with an I. So K-E-L-L-I-B-R-I-N-K. Like the money truck. But not really. I’m not affiliated with Brinks, but yeah, that’s me. Kelly
Matthew Maschler:
Brink. When you raised the last syllable, was that a cheers reference at all?
Kelli Brink:
When I what
Matthew Maschler:
You said? KELL, and then I You went high on the I. Oh yes.
Kelli Brink:
KLLI.
Matthew Maschler:
Was that a cheer? Was that a Cheers reference?
Kelli Brink:
Yes. I mean, I, you know how many times I’ve heard that song through my life a lot? Yes. Kelly Kelly, Kelly Kelly.
Matthew Maschler:
I wasn’t even thinking about it, but when you went up on it, I’m like, I just heard it.
Kelli Brink:
Totally does remind me of that, too, now that you mention it. Yeah. That was great
Matthew Maschler:
Show, by the way. That was a fun character. Do you know the character? No.
Kelli Brink:
Woody
Matthew Maschler:
Kelly was Woody’s girlfriend, and she was super rich and super spoiled.
Staci Garcia:
She
Kelli Brink:
Was sweet though. They had a cute, she was super sweet. Cute little relationship. And he wrote a song and it was just like Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly Kelly. Kelly Kelly.
Staci Garcia:
Like smell
Kelli Brink:
Cat. Yeah. K-E-L-L-Y. Because your mind, mind, mine, mine, mine. It just went on and on.
Matthew Maschler:
Anyway. Alright. Alright. So anyway, yeah. So if you’ve always wanted to start your own podcast, contact pod at Pod Populi podcasting on Instagram.
Kelli Brink:
Yes, that’s right.
Matthew Maschler:
Yep. And they’ll get you sorted. You’ll have your producer, you’ll be, you’ll be podcast famous and I famous and in instant, famous in no
Kelli Brink:
Time. We’ll do our best.
Matthew Maschler:
All right.
Staci Garcia:
We’re good.
Matthew Maschler:
All right. Thank you for joining
Speaker 5:
Us.