Ep. 113 – Introducing Reese S. Garcia, 3rd Generation Boca Raton Real Estate Agent

Matthew Maschler:
Welcome to the Real Estate Finder podcast. I’m Matthew Maschler, real estate broker with the signature real estate companies here in the great state of Florida. And with me, the co-host of the Real Estate Find podcast, Stacy Garcia. Hi, and my real estate partner, Jill Glanzer. Hey, and we have another guest in the studio today. We have a full studio today. Who do we have today? Stacy?
Staci Garcia:
We have my son, my middle son, Reese. Reese Garcia.
Matthew Maschler:
Hi. Hi Reese. How are you?
Reese Garcia:
I’m good.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. Welcome to the Real Estate Fund podcast. Yeah,
Reese Garcia:
It’s nice. It’s very nice.
Matthew Maschler:
Have you listened to our show before?
Reese Garcia:
I have listened to it a little bit, but it was a long time ago. I probably forget what it was even on.
Staci Garcia:
He was like, I hear my mom. W
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, I don’t think my kids listened to the podcast.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah, I was going to say, say yes, but I don’t think that would be, no one would believe it.
Matthew Maschler:
Well, but once you decided to get your real estate license, did it become more attractive to try to listen to the podcast?
Reese Garcia:
Somewhat. I’ve just been, I haven’t really been trying to consume information on real estate, but now I realize there is so much more to real estate than what you learn in the early or the class. The
Matthew Maschler:
Licensing class does not teach you what you need to know.
Reese Garcia:
Yeah,
Matthew Maschler:
But talk to me about the licensing class. You did it with Gold Coast. Yes. And how did you do it? Did you do it in person or self-study
Reese Garcia:
Online. Online, yeah. It was pretty easy. I mean, for me it was pretty easy.
Matthew Maschler:
So I think I’m correct on this, that there’s two ways to do it online. There’s a zoom of a live class, but then there’s an online. Yeah. Which one did you do
Reese Garcia:
Online? Self-study
Matthew Maschler:
Online. Yeah. Okay. I’ve always found that to be the hardest way to do it. But you found it
Reese Garcia:
Acceptable. It’s probably harder for somebody who needs to be taught, but for me, I just read the information and I take the notes and everything, and I’m just teaching myself.
Matthew Maschler:
When I’ve done some of the self-study classes, it’s like you have to wait. You can’t hit next page until a timer runs down.
Reese Garcia:
Oh no, it wasn’t like that at all.
Matthew Maschler:
It wasn’t like that at all.
Reese Garcia:
Yeah, you can spam next every single time, but I don’t do that. Right.
Matthew Maschler:
Well, I would say a lot of times when I’m doing my CLE, it’s funny, I’ll do optional CE, I’ll take classes and things I want to take. So I do much more CLE than I’m required. But when there’s a required class, then I’m going to spam that I’m just going to hit next all day. Try to do it in.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah, but you have this funny thing about it is that you like to time yourself, which Reese also does, and beat your own score. Right. So it’s like a how fast can you do this without actually reading
Matthew Maschler:
It? I once did a 10 hour required class at red lights.
Staci Garcia:
I could see that. I could totally
Matthew Maschler:
See that. But again, you don’t get the information and then you have to take an exam on it. So you did the self-study, you took the notes, then you took the class exam and then the state exam.
Reese Garcia:
Yeah. I had a really tough time with practicing. Personally. I never practiced for anything. I either learn it and I am able to do it or I learn it and I fail. So I practiced because I just wanted to take one practice exam prior to the pre-licensing exam and I took it, I bombed it. I was like, oh my God, I don’t know anything. So I took another one. I got an A on it, took another one, bombed it again, took another one, got an A. I was like, I don’t even know what I’m going to do on this exam. I have no idea. Do I even know how to take a test anymore? I go into the exam room and I’m like, okay, I’m used to this environment. I’m used to taking tests. I get 80% way through the exam and it’s 20 minutes have passed. And I’m like,
Staci Garcia:
He’s a test
Reese Garcia:
Taker then. Am I failing right now? Have I just answered every question, not knowing what’s going on? So I finished the test. I have to be somewhere in 30 minutes, so I know I’m on a time crunch anyway, so I finish in 40 minutes, a hundred questions, and I’m super stressed. Like I just failed. I totally failed. There’s no way I’m getting out of this. I just failed. And they give you, it’s either pass or they give you your grade if you fail, I
Matthew Maschler:
Go up. If you fail, they tell you how they give you grade, but if you pass, yeah. Okay.
Reese Garcia:
So I go up, I return, whatever slip I had, they gave me my paper and it says pass. I’m
Matthew Maschler:
Like, nice.
Reese Garcia:
It was so relieving.
Matthew Maschler:
That was the state exam?
Reese Garcia:
Yes, that was the state exam.
Matthew Maschler:
Where did you take it?
Reese Garcia:
It was at FAU. It was in their student services. Student services place. I’m not sure. It’s their
Staci Garcia:
Test taking room.
Reese Garcia:
Yes, right.
Matthew Maschler:
I’ve taken tests there and it’s the strangest thing. Everybody could be taking a different test.
Reese Garcia:
Totally different. I have no idea what the other people were taking. It did not look like what I was taking.
Matthew Maschler:
It could be insurance, it could be their brokerage license, real stock brokerage license. It
Staci Garcia:
Could be the accuplacer.
Matthew Maschler:
So that’s interesting. So congratulations. Yeah. And then did you interview with any other firms before you joined Signature?
Reese Garcia:
No, I was pretty set on joining Signature. I mean, obviously my mom works for Signature, so it was the easiest thing.
Staci Garcia:
He lives for free. What’s that? I said, he lives in my house for free, going to join someone else, and I’ll be like, okay. Alright, you’re out of here. I get your passive aggressive nature mode.
Matthew Maschler:
So old are you
Reese Garcia:
19?
Matthew Maschler:
You’re 19. You graduated from which high school?
Reese Garcia:
I got my GED, but I did go to Spanish River. You
Matthew Maschler:
Went Spanish
Staci Garcia:
River? Yeah, he was in the covid section.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. You’re 19. Yes. Year. Were you born?
Reese Garcia:
Oh four.
Matthew Maschler:
Oh four. Like my kids? Yeah. Okay. Can I ask what month?
Reese Garcia:
August.
Matthew Maschler:
August. Okay.
Speaker 4:
Yeah, that’s my daughter too. August. August,
Matthew Maschler:
Okay.
Staci Garcia:
He’s the youngest in the year. Remy Remy’s the oldest in the year.
Speaker 4:
August 30th is Lily. Yeah,
Matthew Maschler:
There was, what do you mean? The youngest in the year? So
Staci Garcia:
The year in Florida for schools year deadline. The cutoff. Yeah, the cutoff of September 1st. So re’s September 25th. He’s the oldest in the school year, and Reese is August 21st. So he’s the youngest. And so they were Irish trans in the same grade.
Matthew Maschler:
I was the youngest because I was November 20th and New York City went by calendar year, which I think makes the most sense. It does, because when you fill out that form, it’s like, okay, 1972, you’re all starting. Everyone born in 1972. You’re starting now. What year were you born? Forget your month. We forget your birthday. What year were you born? 1970. I do agree to that. Stay home. Yep. So I was November 25. I was at the end of the year. And when my kids were born in June, I was like, oh, that’s great. They’ll be in the middle of the year. But then when we were in Jersey and then Florida, it was August. I’m like, oh, back to the end of the year. So then Pinecrest had that weird cutoff.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah, you have to be
Matthew Maschler:
The oldest. Yeah. So they were the oldest in the grade versus the youngest in the grade, which I kind of liked for
Staci Garcia:
Them. It does make more sense to be the oldest in the grade. And people did warn me and say, you should hold race back. Grace is extremely smart. So holding back, it wasn’t necessary.
Matthew Maschler:
No. And I didn’t consider it a hold back with mine because it was just the way that Pinecrest did their Yeah, did their year. Do you know, we’re recording right now. It’s the end of April, 2024. There’s someone your age in the NFL now. Someone got drafted.
Reese Garcia:
Yes. I just saw that. Did you see that? Yeah. Which is weird because you have to be three years out of high school in order to get that.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, they must’ve been the
Staci Garcia:
Youngest.
Matthew Maschler:
Youngest in their grade.
Reese Garcia:
Yeah.
Speaker 4:
And they graduated early.
Matthew Maschler:
Graduated early,
Speaker 4:
Right. A year early.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. That was crazy when I saw that. Yeah, professional, professional football player. 19. 19, 20 years old. Set
Staci Garcia:
The bar high there.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, when I first read it, I was like, oh, that made sense. But then I’m like, wait, no, David’s a freshman. His friends his age are sophomores. I would make him
Reese Garcia:
Potentially a sophomore in college.
Matthew Maschler:
Right. Sophomore in college. Not a junior, not three years out. So,
Reese Garcia:
Well, I mean, I know I went to school with someone who’s in the MBA right now.
Matthew Maschler:
BA? Yeah. B is younger people. Skip college for BA. Who did you go to school with?
Reese Garcia:
It was Josh Minot. I actually played basketball with him. I mean, I was relatively good at basketball at the time, but he was long tall. He was physically gifted to play basketball. So
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, there were twins in David’s class in high school that went onto the NBA. I forget where they’re playing.
Reese Garcia:
The Thompson twins?
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah,
Reese Garcia:
I think so. They’re from, I think it in Florida. It’s like a
Staci Garcia:
19, I went to that concert band. Yeah. What? That was my first concert.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, I think
Reese Garcia:
So. I think my cousin played with them as well.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. It’s not Tristan Thompson. He’s 33
Reese Garcia:
Asar, A-U-S-A-R. Yeah. Then Amen. I don’t know how to spell that. I think it’s a MEN.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, that’s who it was. All right. So yeah, so you can reach out to him if he wants to come back to South Florida
Reese Garcia:
By the house. I was just thinking about that last night. Literally.
Matthew Maschler:
All right, so welcome. So you’ve been with us for only a few weeks now, right? Yeah. Did you do the first week training?
Reese Garcia:
Yes.
Matthew Maschler:
How’d that?
Reese Garcia:
I was out of it. I mean, I’m not much of a morning person, but I tried to get into it. I tried to pay attention, but it’s not, it’s, that’s why I did the online at my own pace for the pre-licensing course, because having a scheduled meeting at a certain time, it’s like I’m not ready to take in this information right now, but when I am, it’s like, okay, I got it. It’s
Staci Garcia:
Ingrid. We’re very similar in that. Yeah, you have to follow when your body tells you, you’re receptive to learning and it might not be everyone else’s time,
Reese Garcia:
Right? Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
So one piece of advice I’d like to give new agents is your job is to find someone who wants to buy or sell real estate. Everything else we can help you with, and we can teach, we have support for you, but go out and find someone who wants to buy or sell real estate. And then when you do have your first deals, whether you work with Stacy or if you want to work with Brian or Preston in my office, you’ve met Preston, I’m assuming, and Brian, they could help you with some of the total brokerage and back office stuff, but you want to learn total brokerage. You want to learn the CRM, you want to learn how to draft the offers and writes the addendums, et cetera, et cetera. Yeah.
Staci Garcia:
So I said now at this point, he should probably take the post-licensing class because while he’s still fresh
Matthew Maschler:
And while you have time,
Staci Garcia:
And also though he also has people looking now for a rental college.
Speaker 4:
That’s great.
Staci Garcia:
FAU students.
Matthew Maschler:
Now, I want to tell Jill something that I don’t know if Jill knows Jill. Do you know that Reese is a third generation realtor?
Speaker 4:
I do. Yeah. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
I wonder if we could put that on a business card or
Speaker 4:
Underneath your title as part of your third generation.
Matthew Maschler:
And what’s weird is so many people here in Boca are from New York and you and moved to Florida, third generation Boca Realtor,
Staci Garcia:
Native. Right.
Matthew Maschler:
Third generation Boca, because your grandma used to sell in Boca West. In fact, Jill and I just put a property in Sable Lake under contract,
Speaker 4:
And one of the realtors that was coming to see it, he actually was like, oh, I knew your mom. Well, I knew exactly who he was talking about. I go, oh, that’s my associate, Stacy. That wasn’t the
Matthew Maschler:
Sable Lake. Wait, wait, wait. That wasn’t the Sable Lake property. That was the Baywood property.
Speaker 4:
Oh, the Baywood. Sorry. Baywood was our listing. Sable Lake is our buyer.
Matthew Maschler:
So
Speaker 4:
We’re doing a lot of Boca West stuff
Matthew Maschler:
Right now. So shout out to Boca West. Yeah, we had a listing in Baywood and someone came to see it, and then what did they say?
Speaker 4:
Someone came, he called me to schedule it and he says, oh, you know, I knew your mom. She was great. I go, oh, you’re talking about Stacey’s mom? He goes, oh yeah, I’m sorry. I go, well, that’s okay. I know her. She’s like family. So it’s all good. Yeah,
Staci Garcia:
We like sisters.
Speaker 4:
Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
Mom is also a realtor.
Speaker 4:
Yes, but I was a realtor first. That’s the difference.
Matthew Maschler:
And Judy didn’t necessarily sell a lot in Book West?
Speaker 4:
No, not at all. So I knew it wasn’t my mom.
Staci Garcia:
She’s not a wiener. Yeah,
Speaker 4:
That’s my dad. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
So anyway, but we put a property in Sable Lake under contract. And then your grandmother, when I met her, when I knew her, that’s where she lived in Sable
Staci Garcia:
Lake. 1 9, 2 0 5 s, lake Drive.
Speaker 4:
How funny. S wow. I love Sable Lake. It’s so pretty.
Matthew Maschler:
That’s why I brought up S Lake. But the one that we have under property, stable Lake has two HOAs. There’s stable Lake East named Stable Lake West. And when I’m ins Lake, I look at these two. I can’t tell which ones these I
Staci Garcia:
West. You were going to
Matthew Maschler:
Say that. You know what I was going to say?
Staci Garcia:
I knew. I knew
Matthew Maschler:
Because ones north ones, they’re both One is south of the other one. It’s
Staci Garcia:
True.
Speaker 4:
No. So they’re not east and west. They’re
Staci Garcia:
Not east and west.
Matthew Maschler:
Well, one’s called Sable Lake East and one’s called Sable Lake West. And when I was there, when I was there and I was looking at it, and I’m like, they’re exactly, that one’s north of the other. And I’m like, well, which one’s east one, one’s west. That doesn’t make the one. We have under context, the northern
Staci Garcia:
One, save Lake West,
Matthew Maschler:
That’s west. And then
Staci Garcia:
I know when I think of that, I think that there’s no, how would someone know which one’s save? Lake West? One’s north, that one’s north.
Matthew Maschler:
How does they name
Staci Garcia:
It? I don’t know. I don’t know why they split them, but I also don’t know
Matthew Maschler:
Why it’s split is
Staci Garcia:
It’s like if you live on that side of the pool, you’re on one. And if you live on this side of the pool, you’re on the, is there
Matthew Maschler:
Two different pools?
Staci Garcia:
No,
Matthew Maschler:
It’s one pool. And both communities have access to that. Yep. That makes no sense. I bet
Staci Garcia:
You they’re managed by two different management companies. They are. And I knew who their manager was. Shannon, back in the day, she’d be like, I’m in your mom’s neighborhood. But she was only on, say, lake West. And she would say, what was going on in our side and the other company, it was her brother. And she would say what her brother was doing on the other side, on the east side. That’s funny. Yeah, it was weird. But it was really the south side.
Matthew Maschler:
You would think they would save a couple of dollars by having one management company
Staci Garcia:
Probably. But nothing makes sense. I
Matthew Maschler:
Wonder what the different issues are. There has to be a reason. Is that, are the houses different sizes?
Staci Garcia:
No, I lived in the beginning. When we first moved to Florida, we lived on Boca Rio and we moved to Boca West, and we lived in stable Lake South in my world. But it was Sable Lake East, and it didn’t actually have that name though. It’s Sable Lake. Right. So you turn in and you made a left. And we lived on the first street, and that’s where I lived through high school. And then my mom moved out after when I went to college, and then later moved back into the other side on the right side of the pool. So she’s on a different side. No difference whatsoever except the apartment size.
Matthew Maschler:
I’m frozen on what you just said because it’s one Sable Lake, one sign for Sable Lake. Yeah.
Staci Garcia:
You turn in, it doesn’t have two
Matthew Maschler:
Signs. So when you turn in and you can go left or right, the left side is east, so it’s not even, they were just looking at a piece of paper without a geographic sign. If you were just looking at a piece of paper without a geographic sign, you, you’d make the left west and the right east. Right.
Staci Garcia:
It’s opposite.
Matthew Maschler:
So it’s not even that. It makes no
Staci Garcia:
Sense. It’s very weird. I don’t know. Maybe they were facing the other way.
Matthew Maschler:
But this is a nice unit that we have for our buyer. It’s a second story unit, which I’ve always thought was more desirable, but in Boca West it becomes less desirable because as people age, they don’t want to go up the stairs. But
Staci Garcia:
You get the higher ceilings,
Matthew Maschler:
You get higher ceilings better, a better view. And you don’t have, I was on the first floor or whatever. The road dust doesn’t come in. So he has, it’s a second story unit, great view of the lake. And it’s close to Yamato, but you can get past that. It’s a great view of the lake balconies on two sides. And then there’s a third bedroom upstairs.
Staci Garcia:
Upstairs. That’s what I lived in during high school, and I love that too.
Matthew Maschler:
Yours, was it two or three?
Staci Garcia:
It was upstairs. It was a two bedroom with two and a half bathrooms or no? Yeah, two and a half bathrooms were
Matthew Maschler:
Both bedrooms upstairs.
Staci Garcia:
No, one bedroom
Matthew Maschler:
Upstairs.
Staci Garcia:
So one bedroom down, two bedrooms down, and one
Matthew Maschler:
Upstairs. So it was a three bedroom, same
Staci Garcia:
Model. Actually it was three and a half bathroom.
Matthew Maschler:
So same model as this. So it had that third bedroom?
Staci Garcia:
No, it was three bathrooms. Because mine was a wine opened, had a separate door. So upstairs when you’re up there, had a terrace and you can go outside. That’s where in high school I’d lay out up there without clothes on because nobody would see you up there. Sorry, honey. But you’re up in the middle on the third floor. No one’s around. Plus there was no entrance over there. When I lived in the high school, there was no, your motto, entrance. Oh, really? Yamato didn’t have a, it’s only
Speaker 4:
That there was only two entrances.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah. Yamato didn’t,
Matthew Maschler:
Yada, didn’t even go anywhere. Didn’t
Staci Garcia:
Go west of power line dock, whatever. So yeah, back then, if you went into Sable Lake, it was dead end. And nobody ever went there unless you lived there. And at the time, nobody lived there because my uncle owned the whole street. I told you once, remember I said, if our vacuum broke, he’d say, go in another unit and get another one. They were all like, if you’re coming to Florida and you want to see Boca West, you stay there. It was kind of like an apartment for guests to check out,
Speaker 4:
Like a fly and buy kind of promotion. They
Staci Garcia:
Were all furnished. They all looked exactly the same. They all had all the silverware. They were all turnkey. Nobody owned them. I mean, nobody owned them to buy them. And they were all, my cousin was the leasing agent. And eventually what you did with the property on Lions north of Clint Moore, eventually they were all sold off. And my cousin was the person that did that. That’s great. But that was in 1987.
Matthew Maschler:
So two bedrooms with patios on both sides and great lake views. And then the third bedroom upstairs with its own deck. And so really, really nice unit. It’s a good
Staci Garcia:
Layout. Layout. We had a person from Philly come live with us. When I was in high school, her mom and my mom were best friends in high school and growing up, and she was a horse jockey. Oh wow. Yeah. So she came down here with her horse and she would exercise horses at 4:00 AM 5:00 AM 6:00 AM come home by noon. It was too hot for the horses. And as soon as she walked in the door, our whole house smelled like horses. And I was like, I really like her. She’s really cool. But I was like, oh,
Matthew Maschler:
Nothing.
Staci Garcia:
She lived upstairs, so we didn’t really see her. She was always up there. But yeah, it was really funny. It is a whole separate thing upstairs.
Matthew Maschler:
Right. So yeah. So it’s been on the market. The owners already have, we represent the buyers. The owners already have a place in the Valencia closed in everything. They just don’t want to go. Really? They want to enjoy every single day that they can until they close. They enjoy that view. They should have
Speaker 4:
Just stayed.
Matthew Maschler:
Right? Well, they’re older and they
Staci Garcia:
Can
Speaker 4:
Keep walking up the stairs. Those
Staci Garcia:
Stairs are brutal. I’ve fallen down the, I literally out there. So
Speaker 4:
They’re just up there. They don’t ever leave. They never
Matthew Maschler:
Leave. And they got to do have outdoor chair lifts. Oh wow. That’s what they would have to
Speaker 4:
Install. That’s a funny thought. Just the chair outside going down.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah, we thought about that too for my mom. But I thought it was gross. It would get yucky and it just didn’t seem workable. But yeah, those aren’t friendly stairs. No, they’re brutal. Not at all.
Matthew Maschler:
Can I tell you another stable lake story? Sure. I dunno if you know this one. This was a while ago. This might’ve been before I even met you. I don’t think I knew that your mom was in Sable Lake when this was happening. When I met my friend, Justin Paul, the auctioneer he was selling, they were auctioning off a property in Sable Lake, and his father was the auctioneer. He worked for the auction company, I’m pretty sure this is how I met him when he was trying to sell that property. And I went to the auction with my father and it was a one bedroom, one bathroom in Sable Lake. And the auction failed. Nobody
Speaker 4:
Placed to bed. Nobody
Staci Garcia:
Placed to bed. What year was it?
Matthew Maschler:
Probably the real bottom of the bottom. Two 10 ish. We
Staci Garcia:
Couldn’t give away.
Matthew Maschler:
You couldn’t give it away. And
Staci Garcia:
People, I’ll say that, why are they a dollar, right? Because you have to pay.
Matthew Maschler:
But it wasn’t a dollar was, nobody came with a dollar,
Staci Garcia:
But because if you buy it, you have to pay for the
Matthew Maschler:
Boca West membership. It was 70,000 for the Boca West membership at the time.
Speaker 4:
Now it’s even more
Matthew Maschler:
Now it’s more. Now it’s 110. And at the time it was 70,000 for the Boca West membership. And then you’d have to pay the annual dues and the HOA. And this was before the whole Boca West for a dollar. And the news and everything came on. This was early on, and they did this auction and absolute auction. And there were people registered and
Staci Garcia:
They probably read the small print. And they were like, oh wait, we pay for this much. And we had to pay for this and we had to pay
Speaker 4:
For that. It’s 115 now. I was just
Matthew Maschler:
Wondering, hundred 15 to join. And you don’t get anything back. Maybe a
Speaker 4:
Thousand a hundred dollars. The equity is a hundred dollars. Isn’t that crazy?
Staci Garcia:
Yeah. So back in the day, you would get it and it would stay with the unit and you could sell your unit, but not in Sable Lake. And so what happened was everybody in Boca West at some year when we lived there, all automatically got equity with their house, except they kept out Sable Lake. And they said that the only people in Boca West that don’t have to join the club is Sable Lake. So
Matthew Maschler:
You mean when they sell?
Staci Garcia:
No at all living there. If they lived there, they didn’t have to join the club.
Matthew Maschler:
Everyone who lived there was grandfathered. That’s all. If you lived in Boca West, you did not to join the club. But when you sold, your buyer had to join the club. So there’s two times when Boca West property values really took a hit. One was mandatory membership because if you thought you could sell your property for 50,000 and it was 70 to join, then that took equity away because it was meant to be a country club. And people, if you’re a Wall Street guy, come down to have a weekend house in vacation house in part of the country club. But what was happening is it was being sold to regular people who had no interest in the country club. And then you can’t run a club with four golf courses, a hundred tennis courts and swimming pools. If no one’s joining and the realtors, realtors going to find a buyer, it’s much easier to find a buyer who’s a teacher or plumber or electrician to buy the unit practically for less than a comparable unit and not join the club. So they had to make mandatory membership. And then that took equity away from people. But rightfully so, because it needs to be a country club, it needs to have members. But that was one time when people’s equity took a hit. But anyone who was living there did not have to join. Woodfield went to mandatory membership. There’s still a dozen people in Woodfield that are not members.
Speaker 4:
So back in the eighties when all these clubs were built in Boca, were they all built as non-mandatory membership and then switched because they had
Matthew Maschler:
To switch to mandatory. Boca Point did not switch to never.
Speaker 4:
Right.
Matthew Maschler:
And Boca Point and Boca West were built around the same time.
Speaker 4:
Boca Country Club.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. Boca Country Club never went to
Speaker 4:
Mandatory. Yeah, no. Boca Country Club and Boca Point, both are non-mandatory now
Matthew Maschler:
Still, and probably broken sound and polo were built as mandatory. They knew by then for broken Santa Polo. So anyway, so the auction failed. They couldn’t sell it for a dollar. And I remember the auctioneer Elliot being so mad, so frustrated, like never going to sell a country club auction. And a few years later they tried one in Polo Club. That also felt, and anyway, I tracked that unit and when it did eventually sell, right? I mean, look, if you can’t sell for a hundred thousand, you lower the price, right? 70. But if you can’t sell it for a dollar, how do you lower the price? So when it eventually sold, it sold with a credit from the seller to the buyer of $30,000.
Staci Garcia:
Really?
Matthew Maschler:
Wow. So the purchase price was $1 on the contract, but then the seller credited the buyer 30,000, which the buyer used for the club club was 70. So the incentive from the seller, the seller had, can you
Staci Garcia:
Imagine that I You pay somebody basically $30,000 to buy your house?
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, yeah. So when people were talking about selling for a dollar, I’m like, they don’t sell for a dollar. No one’s paying a dollar for that. It sold for negative 30. So that one in Sable Lake sold for negative $30,000.
Staci Garcia:
Painful. Yeah. I remember when that was happening, and I was watching it happen. We couldn’t decide whether we to pay my mom’s mortgage or not. And I was like, should I pay it? Should I not pay it? I don’t want to waste our money.
Matthew Maschler:
If there’s no equity, you just walk away. And even if you own it for cash, you just don’t pay the taxes or don’t pay
Staci Garcia:
The, I mean, that’s what happened to us. We just decided to stop paying. You walk
Matthew Maschler:
Away. Yeah,
Staci Garcia:
I saw the trend. I think that might actually, I hate to even say it, but I think that might actually happen again in Kings Point, because Oh,
Speaker 4:
Because of the 900 and a thousand dollars
Staci Garcia:
Fees. HOA.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. It’s a thousand dollars a month to join the HOA.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah, it’s over a thousand dollars now. So the
Speaker 4:
Prices have to get reset almost. They do all
Staci Garcia:
Time. The prices
Matthew Maschler:
Have to reset,
Speaker 4:
It has to be destroyed. And then started over
Matthew Maschler:
Again. I was talking with someone who’s in a condo building in Fort Lauderdale, and after the Ventura crash, all these buildings had to build up the reserves and he couldn’t afford the unit anymore. And he’s in a wheelchair and he had spent a lot of money to make his unit handicap accessible. And he borrowed that money from the county under a program that you didn’t necessarily have to pay it back, but if you sold it, you had to pay it back with penalty. And so he couldn’t afford to live there anymore, but he couldn’t sell it. And I tried to give him some advice and help him. When I explained the process and how all these buildings would reset, all these prices were reset how a lot of people are going to lose their units. And then investors come in and buy it, and then a new buyer will come in and that new buyer will be able to afford those monthly association dues. And
Staci Garcia:
It’s a time game.
Matthew Maschler:
I was so matter of fact about it that he thought I was making fun of it or looking forward to it, that I would somehow profit from it. And he got very, very upset with me because he thought I was
Staci Garcia:
Minimizing his pain,
Matthew Maschler:
Not minimizing his pain, but minimizing everyone’s pain. And I’m like, I was just so matter of fact, because I’d seen it before. I’ve been studying this my whole life. So I was just explaining how the world worked. Not that I’m going to going to profit from it. In fact, I was trying to come up with a plan with him that we were going to keep him in his unit. But yeah, he stopped talking to me. It was weird. But anyway, so that unit sold for minus $30,000 Sable Lake. But I made friends with Justin Paul after that. And we had a really good relationship with auctions over the years when deals go bad, but I make a friend. Yeah, way you make a friend is a good way. So questions,
Reese Garcia:
I just have one. It’s not really on the real estate side. It’s more of, I was in, it was one of the new neighborhoods out west on Lions. All of the houses, I mean, most houses here, when you see new neighborhoods, they’re like cookie cutter houses and they all look relatively the same or same model or one of a few in the same neighborhood. Anyway, they’re all white. And I mean every single one of them besides one, and it was the only house with kids playing outside and they have a soccer net, and there was obviously people going in and out of that house, but the whole neighborhood is white. It felt like it had no texture at all. So
Matthew Maschler:
That is the trend or was the trend. People wanted these modern houses and where you could see it really is in on Jag road where Royal Polo,
Reese Garcia:
That’s where I was and that’s exactly where it was. And
Matthew Maschler:
Then what’s the one just north of Royal po Polo that was built first. So Zuora was built first. And what happened? It’s Toll
Reese Garcia:
Brothers too.
Matthew Maschler:
Toll Brothers. And then what happened is, I think it was the first houses in Royal Po Polo, they were the same models that they had in Azura. So they were the Mediterranean houses, but painted white to look modern and it off. So to my opinion, it came off off because those Mediterranean houses shouldn’t have been white like
Reese Garcia:
That white, all white.
Matthew Maschler:
But then they started building more modern models. But just that, I mean, look, what I like to say is that’s why Baskin Robbins has 31 flavors. Everybody likes something different. The trend was modern houses, and you can see beautiful modern houses in Stone Creek Ranch or in Royal po Polo. So when these track homes, these cookie cutter homes are built, they’re built with a nod towards that kind of style. And that’s what people seem to, even my street, which is heavy Mediterranean, everything new that’s coming in is white and modern. And some of the more traditional people on the street are upset. They don’t want to see all this white and modern. I have a funny story. When I was in Stone Creek and people were Stone Creek, all the houses were custom and there was no guidelines on what could be built. It didn’t say what types of styles could be built, but it had to say conform to the community and it had to say in good taste or whatnot. So one of the longtime residents, he was concerned, what if someone came in and built an igloo next door to him? Like, well, we’ve never proven igloo. But what was eventually built next door, a super modern white square bunker ox. Really nice. It was the first of these modern houses I’d ever seen. But it was from a distance. It kind looked like, I always think it looked like the phone company, but it was a white box, basically.
Poor guy. It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. He kept saying, what if they built an igloo next door to me? Oh, we would never do that. This is square, not round like an
Staci Garcia:
Igloo. Silly man.
Matthew Maschler:
But yeah, and trends change, right? Trends change with the white kitchens and everything. I used to say that everybody wants to live in the Apple store, right? Apple store in Chipotle. That was the look that everybody wanted. And before that, everything was in the brown family. You had all this brown countertops and brown kitchens and that comes out. And when modern started, I would say to people, yeah, modern’s great, but just be careful because rustic farmhouse, urban cowboy may come next. That’s so
Staci Garcia:
Funny. Reese, I have nightstands from the nineties that are Mexican. We got them. They’re truly authentic Mexican. I had this whole Mexican theme and they’re in my garage and Reese was like, just put them out at the curb. Nobody wants them. They’re gross.
Reese Garcia:
I’m like, they also, you can barely open the roar.
Staci Garcia:
They’re authentic Mexican. So he said, just been out the curb. They’re junk. I’m like, well, it’s like Mexican’s going to come back in. Not Mexican tile maybe, but these the authentic Mexican. I see it. Some people still like it.
Matthew Maschler:
Joe, what was that Mexican house that we sold in St. Andrew’s?
Speaker 4:
St. Andrew’s. That’s going to take me a minute. Really? What house jog my memory.
Matthew Maschler:
It was the second house in from the street with a great lake view. You sold it in a minute and a half.
Speaker 4:
I sold it in a minute and a half. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
You thought that we left going, how the hell are we going to sell this? It was like Aztec pyramid.
Speaker 4:
Okay. I don’t know why it’s not ringing a bell, but I’m sure later on today it’ll come right into my mind and I’ll be like, I can’t believe I didn’t remember that
Matthew Maschler:
The lady had all the trophies from all the golf tournaments that she won.
Speaker 4:
Okay. Oh, that one? Yes. The gentleman, she had passed away. The gentleman called us from our advertisement, and it was total 1980s Amada Pena paintings. It was Aztec. And yes, it was a great lot
Matthew Maschler:
Though. Everything was triangles, kitchen cabinets made Aztec. Think of it. Aztec Pyramid of kitchen cabinets. So you walked into the kitchen and you saw cabinets, triangles like pyramids, but Aztec pyramids. Oh, a bad joke. Should I say a bad joke?
Speaker 4:
Is it? Yeah, go ahead. You
Matthew Maschler:
See pictures of Egypt and everybody wonders who built the pyramids? Yeah. How come when they see the Aztec pyramids in Mexico? Nobody wonders who built votes?
Staci Garcia:
I guess they’re not that big
Matthew Maschler:
Mexican builders.
Staci Garcia:
Oh
Matthew Maschler:
Gosh, no wonders who build them. We all know
Speaker 4:
That was on balance tree. Was
Matthew Maschler:
It balance tree? Yeah. Yeah. And then the, so living room, you had all this pyramid cabinets. Usually you have this heavy Mediterranean, and this was Aztec. This wasn’t even Mexican. This was Aztec. It was crazy.
Speaker 4:
The photos are gone now. But yeah, photos, we took them down.
Reese Garcia:
There’s this house right by my cousins on a, they live right by the beach. Anyway, it looks like not a cabana, but you know how the haze on the roof of
Matthew Maschler:
The barn a thatch?
Reese Garcia:
Yes. And I’ve never seen a car outside of that house. I don’t even know who lives there, but it’s one story. But the roof goes so high. There might be a second story in there, but it just looks like, looks like a beach house. But it’s also next to a bunch of houses that are very nice houses that are, they don’t look anything alike. What
Matthew Maschler:
Neighborhood is it?
Staci Garcia:
It’s in the Riviera. The
Speaker 4:
Riviera. Is it like a tiki hut on the top? Yes. Yes. That’s what it is. Yes.
Reese Garcia:
That’s what I was looking for. Got
Speaker 4:
You.
Matthew Maschler:
It’s weird sometimes when you see these slanty roofs, Woodfield club in book of Bath and tennis, that you have these houses with the Landy roofs. There’s a house in Woodfield, in princess states. We were talking about princess states earlier that has alany roof. And these people spend so much time gut remodeling it. And it looks spectacular now, but it still has that slanty roof. And I’m like, they should just taken it down a couple years from now. They’re just not going to be happy. I dunno. But again, maybe someone like slanty roof who,
Staci Garcia:
Alright, we’ll come back in style. I
Matthew Maschler:
Hate slanty roofs. I am very symmetrical and if I’m in a room and the roof is slanty, I don’t feel comfortable. I feel discombobulated. I like right angles.
Speaker 4:
Oh, you don’t like those old houses where upstairs there’s that slant and there’s that little room up there, like a guest room.
Matthew Maschler:
Oh, when you’re in that attic, when both
Speaker 4:
Rooms go, it’s creepy.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, I feel claustrophobic. And even if the lowest point is still 10 feet high, I feel like the walls are closing in on my,
Staci Garcia:
Usually when I see those on the MLSI look, the first thing I look for is to see if they’re made of wood frame, because I don’t usually even entertain the wood frame by, you know what I mean, in Florida
Matthew Maschler:
Because of TURs. Yeah.
Staci Garcia:
So the first thing I think of when you see the roof like that, I think it’s wood frame. The whole house has got to be wood frame. Even if it’s cute, we’re in a great place or it needs to be redone, then the whole house is still wood frame. Yeah.
Speaker 4:
You have experience living in a wood frame. I
Staci Garcia:
Do. And you know what, and Fairfield had his bedroom. Their bedroom had a big, huge corner, high ceiling. That’s right. Did my ceiling was low, his ceiling was high.
Speaker 4:
Did that have termites? Yeah. That’s
Staci Garcia:
Why Big time, right?
Speaker 4:
Oh yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
Not when we lived there, but every house in there is going to get termites.
Speaker 4:
Yeah,
Staci Garcia:
It did Downstairs. We did.
Matthew Maschler:
Yep. Had those big circus tents.
Staci Garcia:
We did. We had the circus tent.
Matthew Maschler:
Did we?
Staci Garcia:
I guess I You guys were little. We
Matthew Maschler:
Were little. What happened with termites in Baywood?
Speaker 4:
Oh, so there were no active live termites? There was a sticker, but there was a sticker and we couldn’t read the date. Now when I zoomed in on it, I thought it said 2023, but he thinks it might’ve said 2013, which was before his dad owned it. They asked me, oh, there’s a sticker. Can you tell us when it was treated? Did they have any records of it? And he had inherited it from his dad who passed away. And he’s like, there’s nothing in the file. Right. So yeah, nothing happened. I just told her that they didn’t know anything about it and she never asked me again.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah, because usually once the house is treated for termites and there’s a warranty and you go back to that company. But I
Speaker 4:
Guess I could have called, but she never asked me about
Matthew Maschler:
It. You got to read that sticker. Right? You know it’s old if it has a 4 0 7 area code on it.
Staci Garcia:
That’s true.
Speaker 4:
Good point. Orlando. Oh, that was originally
Staci Garcia:
Boa. I had a 4 0 7
Speaker 4:
Number. Oh, so then it was way before 2013. It was probably 2003. I was
Staci Garcia:
Going to say it could have been before
Speaker 4:
That. Or 93. I don’t know. I tried to zoom in on it.
Matthew Maschler:
I still can remember my father’s home phone number. I still have to think. I think you think 4 0 7? 4 0 7 because it’s in four eight. Seven is the prefix. So I’m like 4 0 7. Four seven.
Staci Garcia:
That’s so funny. Then
Matthew Maschler:
I go 4 0 7 5 6 1 5 6 1. But what’s the next that? 5 6 1. I blank out then my mind, I have to start 4 8 7. It’s
Staci Garcia:
Funny, you and I think alike. My mom’s work number at Boca West was 4 0 7 4 8 3 9 9 4 oh. And the next person was 9 9 4 1 9 9 4 2. You know, whatever. And so I always think 4 0 7 2. Yeah,
Matthew Maschler:
You can’t remember it from the middle. Yeah. Miami and Broward were 3 0 5 and Palm Beach County all the way to Orlando was 4 0 7.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah. Nobody wanted to give up a 3 0 5 for a nine. Five four. If you were a 9 5 4, you were bumming out. Same thing with 7, 5 4. After 9 54,
Matthew Maschler:
Did Broward become something before three? Oh no, 5 6 1 was early. So Broward and Miami were 3 0 5. So when Broward got 9 54 is when we got five. Six one. Yeah. Nobody giving it up. If 4 0 7 was poka to Orlando, there’s one big phone company customer that probably made the difference. Why? Orlando got to keep their area code.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah. Who? Publix
Matthew Maschler:
Dude. Disney World. Oh they That’s true. They probably had the most phone numbers. They would’ve had to change every business card, every letterhead, everything. Because even when you see the Disney World commercials, they still say 4 0 7 w Disney. Oh. So Disney World would’ve had, it was much easier to change everybody else than to make Disney World change that phone number.
Staci Garcia:
I know that when they added 7 5 4 to 9 5 4.
Matthew Maschler:
But that was an over like
Staci Garcia:
Yeah, but I remember that everybody was trying to hold strong on their area codes. He’s probably like, what are you guys talking about? I didn’t even
Matthew Maschler:
Know there was different area codes. What’s an area code?
Staci Garcia:
It’s so funny,
Matthew Maschler:
Reese, all the original area codes, the second digit was a zero or a one. Oh. So Miami being 3 0 5. New York City being 2 1 2, that middle digit was a zero or a one. So on all the original area codes. So
Staci Garcia:
Yeah, Philly is a 2 1 5.
Matthew Maschler:
Philly’s 2 1 5.
Staci Garcia:
When I, it used to be, lemme just back up because people ask people for a 10 digit area code, right? It used to be 10 digit phone number. Right. People didn’t ask for a 10 digit phone number back 20 years ago. They asked for your seven digit phone
Matthew Maschler:
Number when I was your age and I gave out someone my phone number, I did not have to say what my area code was. Right. Alright. I could give you my phone, sent the number and you just knew. You just knew, oh, that’s in New York City. So you got dial 2 1 2 first. It wasn’t, the area code wasn’t part of your phone number. It was like, you know how you got dial one. The area code was like that. You didn’t even think about it or give it out as part of your number. But I was two and two in Staten Island when I was a kid and they had to bring in 7 1 8, the one in the middle. And then Manhattan kept 2 1 2 and the rest of Brooklyn, Queens and State Island went to 7 1 8 and everyone went kicking into screaming. But that was early on because the other phone numbers came later. Manhattan’s two one two became six. Four six. They did it as an integer of 2 1 2. Yeah. But yeah. But now there’s so many area codes and things that everybody just, your kids, you don’t care what area. If you got a new phone number, would you care if it was 5, 6, 1 or 9 5 4? No, not at all. Not at all. Not at all.
Staci Garcia:
It’s funny too, you want to hear something funny is every what, every two years we get to upgrade our phones and sometimes I get a discount if I change and get new numbers, A new phone number gets a discount. So since we’re four lines, sometimes two of my kids have to change their phone number. It’s definitely not going to be me. Right. So one of my kids always,
Reese Garcia:
It’s always me and Rayon. Yeah,
Staci Garcia:
You’re
Speaker 4:
Okay with it. You’re like, yeah, let’s fresh
Staci Garcia:
Start. Imagine though, up until now, he never thought twice someone about getting a new number. It never meant anything. I’d say, okay, who’s getting a new number? And Reese and Rad were like, okay, well I’ll get a new number now if I said to him, well, people don’t really know your numbers anymore, they’s just saved on the phone. Right, right. I
Reese Garcia:
Think it matters more for you too. Well, everyone knows your number already, but also Remy has 5 6 1 wash, which is what he does. So I guess having 5 6 1 in there would matter a lot for him. Is that,
Staci Garcia:
That’s his business
Matthew Maschler:
Number, but 5 6 1, is it 5 6 1 5 6 1. Wash. It is. So he has 5 6 5 6. One prefix. Yeah. Yeah. The three digits that begin the number, it’s called a prefix. Yeah, you heard that word? Yes. Okay.
And prefixes used to be geographic, right? It would be where in Boca you were. Yeah. So different neighborhoods had different prefixes. So you could tell if someone gave you a phone number, you could tell where they lived, not accurately, but regionally based on their prefix. So where I was in State Island, my neighborhood had, I was 7, 6, 1, but there was 7, 6, 1, 6, 9, 8, and 4, 9, 4. If you got any of those three prefixes, that was generally right around where I lived. So when I hear someone with a 4 87 prefix, which I don’t hear a lot, but the three oh two on a cell phone, the first cell phones in Boca were all three oh two, five six one three oh two five six one, three oh two. So anyone ever hear anyone who
Staci Garcia:
They got their cell be three,
Matthew Maschler:
Two prefix. I’m like, oh, you’ve been in Boca a long time. And that’s, that’s an original prefix. So 5 6 1 was all Palm Beach County. Right. But 3 0 2 was Boca. So depending on where in Palm Beach County he lives,
Staci Garcia:
I think it’s weird to think about what he thinks about what Reese thinks about these numbers. They do. They’re really significant to us. If someone gives me their phone number and their cell phone number and it’s two three nine, it’s 5 6 1 2, 3 9. I know they got their number right when I got my number. When you got yours, 2, 3, 9. And then if their number is really similar to mine, I feel like they must have gotten their number the same day I got my number. You know what I mean? But of course, we’re attached to our phones and our numbers and now I don’t think many younger people don’t care about their number as much because they can just save. It’s something new.
Matthew Maschler:
Do you know your kids’ phone numbers? No.
Speaker 4:
And there’s other ways for them to get in touch with each other besides their phone numbers. That’s
Matthew Maschler:
True. Do you know your kids’ phone numbers? No.
Speaker 4:
That’s terrible.
Matthew Maschler:
I
Reese Garcia:
Don’t know, but I’ve always known everyone. That’s just me though.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah, he’s a number person. I’m a number person. But I don’t know since my kids’ numbers changed, I don’t know. I
Speaker 4:
Know. And that’s
Matthew Maschler:
It, because you don’t dial the, we knew the numbers by heart because you had to dial ’em. Yeah.
Reese Garcia:
Well I think every time I call you I dial it.
Matthew Maschler:
You dial
Reese Garcia:
It? Yeah. I definitely dial or that’s so special. I’m barely calling her because you try and call her.
Staci Garcia:
I don’t answer.
Speaker 4:
She doesn’t answer. I can’t attest
Staci Garcia:
To that. I text back, why are you calling me
Matthew Maschler:
Stacey’s answering outgoing messages. Literally. Why are you calling me? Text me.
Reese Garcia:
Yeah. But it’s so much easier because I know the number rather than trying to find the contact and pressing the button and then pressing the call button. Then you have to choose mobile or whatever. So I just know the number so it’s easy.
Matthew Maschler:
See, we used to have, on our landlines, we used to have dedicated buttons. You have two or three or sometimes 10, just like
Staci Garcia:
Memory,
Matthew Maschler:
One memory buttons and you just put it in the speed dial. Yeah, speed dial the number and you’d always have to, it was so cool at the time, you didn’t have to dial the numbers. You speed dial. But yeah, because we don’t dial the number, it’s not ingrained
Staci Garcia:
In an emergency situation. If someone asked me who to call, I’d have to tell them my ex-husband’s business number. It’s the only number I know. I don’t even know my or my son’s number right now
Matthew Maschler:
In an emergency.
Staci Garcia:
It’s funny though. It’s not an actual, I mean, I said once I said to you guys, we used to call to see what time it is and we called time.
Reese Garcia:
You were just talking about that.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah. I called 1 805 5 5 1 2 1 2.
Speaker 4:
I
Staci Garcia:
Remember that. And it would tell you what time it is and my kids are like, how do you not know what time it’s, I’m like, because
Speaker 4:
It wasn’t on our phone phones like that. It
Matthew Maschler:
Was 9, 7, 6.
Speaker 4:
If we didn’t never watch.
Staci Garcia:
No, it was
Matthew Maschler:
Did you have to pay for it? You didn’t have to pay for it.
Staci Garcia:
You know what, it was a one 800 number, so it was free and I was obsessed with the phone when I was little. So anyone that put the phone number on TV that said 1-800-SOMETHING, so what I used to call all the time was the Columbia records. My mom was going to kill me and also called 1-800-MATTRESS leave off the US for savings. I called all those 1-800-NUMBERS because you could call for free. So we got a lot of mail from whoever
Matthew Maschler:
I called em. What did you say? I don’t know. I was like, hi for a mattress. Do you want a mattress? No.
Speaker 4:
Well, because we used to prank call. This was an easy way to prank
Staci Garcia:
Call. I wanted to talk to somebody back then.
Speaker 4:
You got it all out of the way. Then
Staci Garcia:
I did. I wore out myself by age 13. I was done.
Reese Garcia:
We were also talking about the 6 1 1 and
Staci Garcia:
3 1 1. Oh yes. So we used to call you could what? Call four one one for information. Yeah. I don’t even know if that is a thing now, but you could call six one one for phone help now, right?
Reese Garcia:
Yeah. I have no idea what they are. And was it you or was it dad explaining to
Staci Garcia:
Me? I know that we had a conversation about how I called time. We were just talking about that.
Reese Garcia:
Yeah, I mean I knew 4 0 1 1 just because it’s like the phone book, whatever,
Matthew Maschler:
And four oh one almost became a slang word. A word
Staci Garcia:
Right.
Speaker 4:
For information. Give me the 4 1 1. Yep. Now all the people that used to call there because they wanted to be friends, are on nextdoor writing long paragraphs.
Matthew Maschler:
Comedians would have a 800 number where you can call and listen to a joke. Really? Yeah. There was before the internet, there was the movie phone you could dial.
Reese Garcia:
Oh, movie phone. You listen to a movie on your phone? No.
Speaker 4:
You found out what the movie times you
Matthew Maschler:
Get the movie Times.
Staci Garcia:
Movie times. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
You get the movie times.
Staci Garcia:
You had to listen to the whole recording to find out what time you could go to the
Matthew Maschler:
Movie, listen to an advertisement, and then you would put in your zip code and it would tell you, it would give you a list of theaters and you press the button for the theater that you wanted and it would give you the list of movies. It would press a button for the movie
Reese Garcia:
That you wanted. Could you buy them on the phone? No.
Matthew Maschler:
No, no.
Reese Garcia:
Okay.
Staci Garcia:
It was just listen to the recording.
Reese Garcia:
My friend, he’s very strong on not buying any movie. Movie tickets online. He’s
Matthew Maschler:
Like, because of the fee?
Reese Garcia:
Well, no, it’s a matter of he wants the movie to start on time. So he wants everyone to get there early. And then he wants people to be in their seat, so they have to get the ticket early for the seat they want, and then they can all be on time for the movie. Whereas everyone just buys their tickets online and they’re like, oh, I’ll bell be there in a bit.
Staci Garcia:
I have that luxury that no one’s going to sit in their seat. They bought that seat.
Matthew Maschler:
Right. It’s nice to have the assigned seat. I
Staci Garcia:
Do agree.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. Without the assigned seat, you had to get there early to get a good seat
Staci Garcia:
Back in the day. Yeah. Or else you were
Matthew Maschler:
Singing first and you couldn’t get there early if you didn’t know what time the movie was, which is why you had to call the number. True.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah. It’s funny now to even think about it. I remember when they came out with the reserve seating and we were like, oh my God, that’s blasphemy. And then we went and we’re like, Ooh, this is really nice. And
Reese Garcia:
Then the seats got nicer.
Speaker 4:
The seats are really nice.
Matthew Maschler:
So yeah. So there’s something about real estate with the phones, getting those letters to spell out time or mattress or flowers. That’s almost a real estate play.
Staci Garcia:
The number is worth money. Just like a website. Not
Matthew Maschler:
Anymore though. Well,
Staci Garcia:
It kind of is because you know that if your number is significant, a number that, for example, on the taxi cabs, you know how their number is? 8, 8, 8 8 8 8, 8 8, 8 8. Like that. Those numbers, they’re always going to be that number. So that number is worth money.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. I’m just going to use my Uber app
Staci Garcia:
Car know for a certain businesses.
Matthew Maschler:
But if you want the number for the podcast studio, you Google the podcast studio and then you see the number. You just touch it and then your phone dust dials it.
Staci Garcia:
I’ll tell you who it’s really good for people that get arrested and go to, and they make one phone call because they can’t remember anyone’s number.
Reese Garcia:
But then they have the, I can’t even remember the number now, but there’s always on the radio. I can’t remember the law firm either. It’s 5 6 1 something, something something. 7 7 7 7.
Staci Garcia:
Yeah. It’s Furman and Buren Bones.
Matthew Maschler:
Yes. Stagger Go Green.
Reese Garcia:
Yes.
Staci Garcia:
They’re one of them. We used to say that a lot, right?
Matthew Maschler:
We are looking for a personal injury. A 1-800-COLLEAGUE. Yeah, exactly. 100 colleague.
Reese Garcia:
Then there was 1 804 1 1 Payne.
Matthew Maschler:
So we are looking for sponsors here on the Real Estate Finder package.
Reese Garcia:
It was Freeman Injury Law.
Staci Garcia:
He’s going to
Reese Garcia:
Go crazy. No, I just had to sing it to myself in my head.
Matthew Maschler:
But it’s always injury law. All these people are injury law firms, not the criminal law firms.
Staci Garcia:
That’s true. Yeah. A criminal law firm should do the same.
Matthew Maschler:
That’s the one that you, I mean, to remember a number,
Staci Garcia:
Right? Yeah. I think they write it above the payphone in jail or whatever. It’s on the wall.
Matthew Maschler:
Those are always the best criminal attorneys. Yeah.
Staci Garcia:
Well the quickest is the most important.
Matthew Maschler:
I always think criminal attorneys is a funny word. Someone’s real estate attorney or this type of attorney. What type of attorney? You a criminal attorney? No, no, we know that. But criminal attorney,
Staci Garcia:
When you drive to Miami, there’s a bunch of billboards that say like, call Jared. Right. And it’s Jared’s something. I don’t dunno if you look at the billboards, but
Matthew Maschler:
Hired
Staci Garcia:
Jared. Yeah, hired Jared. Or call Jared. And I always think it’s Jared, the subway guy, Jared, the subway. Why would I want to call him? Right? But it’s an attorney for a personal injury or something. But that’s the first thing I think. But also that guy’s younger than the whole Jared issue. Right. So he doesn’t even equate Jared. His name too. Some pedophile from Subway.
Matthew Maschler:
If you hear Jared, do you think Subway? No. No. See
Reese Garcia:
The only name synonymous with a company. Well flow from Progressive and then there’s Jake from State Farm.
Matthew Maschler:
Jake from State Farm. That’s
Reese Garcia:
It. That’s all I know.
Matthew Maschler:
Yeah. Mostly insurance companies, right?
Staci Garcia:
Yeah. And my kids will do all the, without even knowing it, they’ll do just like the Red Robin. Yum. Whenever you hear something and jokingly I’ll say it and they’ll all say the thing afterwards there. There you go. Yeah, it’s very funny.
Matthew Maschler:
Alright. Alright. So if someone wants to hire you as a real estate agent, are you set up? Do you have your website? You have?
Reese Garcia:
I don’t have a website yet. Give out
Matthew Maschler:
Your phone number.
Staci Garcia:
He actually does have a website. He just hasn’t set it up yet.
Matthew Maschler:
Hasn’t set that up. It’s his
Staci Garcia:
Name.
Reese Garcia:
It is my name. Reese
Staci Garcia:
Garcia. That’s awesome. Reese Garcia.
Reese Garcia:
Reese s Garcia. Yeah.
Matthew Maschler:
Reeses Garcia
Staci Garcia:
Yes. Dot com.
Reese Garcia:
Well middle name S but yes,
Matthew Maschler:
That’s for savings.
Staci Garcia:
That’s a joke with us. What? I said that’s a joke with us. That was the thing that asked for savings.
Matthew Maschler:
So Reese s garcia.com. What is the S for
Reese Garcia:
Sterling?
Matthew Maschler:
Sterling, yes. Strong s Garcia. Was Reese Garcia taken?
Staci Garcia:
I think so.
Reese Garcia:
Well it’s also my email.
Staci Garcia:
Reese s Garcia. Yeah,
Reese Garcia:
But that was made independent. I didn’t even know that she had a website that was just, I made Reese s garciaGarcia@gmail.com. You
Staci Garcia:
Were? I think it was taken, I bought all the kids’ websites for the 20 year
Matthew Maschler:
Period. Makes sense. And do you have realestate fund.com? Yes. Alright, that’s a good one too. And phone number?
Reese Garcia:
(561) 654-9586.
Matthew Maschler:
Alright,
Staci Garcia:
Got to write that down.
Matthew Maschler:
Alright, and if you do need a car wash, say that you heard about us on the Real Estate Finder podcast. Would you rather give him some kind of discount or break or not really?
Reese Garcia:
Probably not. Probably. But he does do a really good job. He
Staci Garcia:
Does a great
Matthew Maschler:
Job. And which one does the car wash? Remy. Remy. Remy. Alright. So if you need your car wash, reach out to Remy Garcia. If you need your place to park your car, reach out to Reese.
Reese Garcia:
Yeah.
Staci Garcia:
Okay.
Matthew Maschler:
Very good. Alright. Alright. Alright. Thank you for joining us on the Real Estate Finder podcast.
Speaker 5:
The future looks bright and the storms pass by the sky’s dog. Blue. When it’s almost that time, light shows cameras flash when I pass. Living in the moment, forget about the past. They save the best for last. Matthew Mania. We about to make a splash. Life is a marathon full of sharp turns. Got to keep pace while the hands on the clock turns high Sticks. Five star real. I run a show. You can tell the boss in place electricity energy if vibrate. I’m always on time. Even if I’m making, I make dreams come true. Living my life. Hope the same for you. Success. My sights got a real clear view. If you don’t know the time, a clue.
Speaker 6:
Know it. You know it. It’s it. You know what time it is.
Speaker 5:
You know what time. It’s time. It’s you know what time. You know what? You know time. You know what time. Yeah. Got him shook, scared. Can’t look. We’re not afraid of the big bad wolf.