Ep. 102 – Selling Success with Rebecca Skeba Mancini

Matthew Maschler:

Welcome to the Real Estate Finder podcast. I’m Matthew Maschler, real estate broker with the signature real estate companies here in the great state of Florida. And today’s co-host of the Matthew Mania podcast, Preston Smith. Hi Preston, how are you? Hey man, how are you doing? I’m doing pretty good. And we have a very, very special guest in the podcast studio today. She’s our neighbor. She records the podcast after us, so we figured why not bring her in a little early and get a conversation started. We have Rebecca Skiba Mancini. Did I say that

Rebecca Skeba Mancinii:

Right? You said it right? Rebecca

Matthew Maschler:

Skiba.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Mancini. Thank you for having me, gentlemen. It’s great

Matthew Maschler:

To have you from the Selling Success Podcast. Oh, wow.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yes. Selling success.

Matthew Maschler:

So tell me about the Selling Success podcast.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

So I started my journey off on, I’ve been an entrepreneur my entire life and I’ve had three extremely successful businesses. And I started my businesses up when I was very young. And I would go around asking, well-known people that I knew had businesses. I would ask them information. They’re like, you’re too young. Worry about that later on in life. So I started off my career by Google. I started Googling how to, and I went to the library. Back then computers, you would have to go to the library and get on a computer. We didn’t have a desktop at home. And I researched how to be an entrepreneur and how to start up my own companies. I got my real estate license at 19. At

Matthew Maschler:

1919, just newly minted. My

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Parents have been in real estate my entire life.

Matthew Maschler:

Were they agents or agents?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yep, they were agents here in Florida. They’re in Florida. Yep. And then I figured my dad, I got pregnant at 19. I had my son at 20. My dad’s like, you need to get your real estate license. I had been in real estate really my entire life because my parents have been in real estate forever. So I’ve been sitting at open houses since we’ve lived in Florida since 1989, and it’s been a lot of fun.

Matthew Maschler:

Can you say where in Florida?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I live in Boca Ratone.

Matthew Maschler:

You grew up here?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I grew up here in Boca. Ratone. Boca

Matthew Maschler:

High?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Nope. Olympic Heights. Olympic

Matthew Maschler:

Heights,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yes. Okay.

Matthew Maschler:

Yes. I like to, when I meet people, sometimes if I’m not sure where they’re from, I’ll say, where’d you go to high school? Because that locks them in. Because where you’re from, it could be different years, different ages. So I like to lock in high school, and then what I’ll do is, I’ll guess there’s four high schools in Boca, so I’ll guess, and I have a one on four shot of being Right. In which case I look amazing, but even if I’m wrong, it doesn’t look that bad that,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

But there’s the four public schools,

Matthew Maschler:

Four public

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

High schools, and then you had the private ones attached with

Matthew Maschler:

It. Right.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I should have really threw you for a loop and told you Pope

Matthew Maschler:

Pope. See Pope St. Andrew’s only of those two

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Pine Crest

Matthew Maschler:

High schools in Fort

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Lauderdale. Oh, that’s true. But you

Matthew Maschler:

Could have went there. You could have went to

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Any, right, right, right.

Matthew Maschler:

And then some destination, high schools, et cetera. So yeah. So again, I’d rather take a shot and be wrong.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

The risk would be right. Absolutely. But you were very close. You did East Boca. I’m in West Boca.

Matthew Maschler:

Right, right. I just had a guess. Where’d you grow up? In West Boca?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I lived in, so logger’s run, I lived in. And then So you have Goodger, you did, did Laggers run? I was actually, when we first moved to Florida, I hope you know the Street Woodchuck. I lived on Woodchuck Wood. And then from Woodchuck we built a house in the lake, and then I moved into the Lake Boca. And then from there I got married. I moved to Central Boca Boca Walk, and then I moved out west into Boca Winds.

Matthew Maschler:

Boca Winds now. Yep. I use Central Boca. Not a lot of people use Central Boca, so I like that you said that.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah. Oh, I always say Central Boca. I lived in Central. I say Central because it’s central. I lived in Central Boca.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah. I have two things. One is I do say Central because for a lot of people, west Boca is laggers run and shadow wood. And if you live, let’s say near the mall or Mill Pond, you’re not as far west as the people that are saying West Boca. You’re definitely not East Boca. So we created the Central Boca

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

That have How long have you lived here for?

Matthew Maschler:

I’ve lived here full-time since 2005.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Okay, so it’s been a long time for you too.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah, but then growing up, my father had a house in Boca West, so we would vacation here. I vacationed here since I’d say late eighties. I remember Spring break, 1991. I spent in Boca West. That was a lot of fun. I wasn’t around yet.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

You said you weren’t around yet. Yeah, born yet. How old are you?

Matthew Maschler:

I’m 31. Just one year about baby. I very much enjoyed the Bennigan’s un Glades in the turnpike. Oh

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah. Do you remember the Sizzler?

Matthew Maschler:

Where was

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Sizzler? Sizzler was in Mission Bay Plaza.

Matthew Maschler:

Mission Bay? Yeah. I was thinking

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

In Mission Bay. And then there was also Kenny Rogers Roasters.

Matthew Maschler:

Kenny Rogers Roasters. And then Pete Rose. Pete

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Rose. Oh, I used to work at Wilt Chamberlains. Did you like work at Will Chamberlains? I did. Through high school. I worked on Wilt Chamberlains and then Six Story, but the owners sexually harassed me and

Matthew Maschler:

Multiple Chamberlain sexually

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Harassed you. Not Wilt Chamberlain. He did not own it. They just bought his name. I’m so stupid

Matthew Maschler:

And I’m making fun of something so serious. I’m so sorry about

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

That. No, no, no. I mean, I’m fine with it now. But I mean, it was brutal. They had to close down. They had multiple lawsuits going against

Matthew Maschler:

Him. That’s why

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

They closed. That’s why they closed. But their food was delicious. I actually loved their Bar Foods. One of those girls, I loved it. It was absolutely delicious. I still crave their food to this day,

Matthew Maschler:

Preston, if you’ve never been, they had, it was a sports bar and there were screens everywhere. So a lot of sports bars have, but the problem was sports bars, you can’t listen to the commentary. Every table had a radio. Wow. And you can turn it on the channel on That’s really cool. The television, it would say with channel. And then there was a little dial at the table. So if you wanted to watch that particular game, and the television said seven underneath, you just went to seven, and now you could hear that game at your table. It was amazing. And I once met Pete Rose.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Oh yeah. He was always there. He was always recording in the radio station in the front. Yeah.

Matthew Maschler:

Pete Rose, ballpark Cafe was across the street on the other side of Glades Road from Will Chamberlains and of anything you could say to Wil Pete Rose. You know what I said to him? What’d you say? I told him, I go Wilt Chamberlains and not Pete Rose.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Oh my gosh. What’d he say?

Matthew Maschler:

Because the games that Pete Rose’s were always busted.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

You know what, that’s one thing at Wil Chamberlains, he always had good

Matthew Maschler:

People. And Pete Rose, you got to get your games fixed. Yeah,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah. We always had our games working over at Will Chamberlains. If not, they gave you a stack load of tickets. But I’ve met Will Chamberlains quite a few times. And Did you? Yeah.

Matthew Maschler:

You said I met Will Chamberlains,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Wilt Chamberlain

Matthew Maschler:

Multiple times. Will Chamberlains or Chamberlains.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I’ve met him multiple times. Yeah. He would always come in and sign autographs. Super

Matthew Maschler:

Tall.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

That’s cool. Super tall and definitely a ladies man. Oh yeah. They all loved him over there. Oh yeah.

Matthew Maschler:

And the other thing that Will Chamberlain had was, was it half court or a quarter court? Indoor basketball court,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yes. Oh, wow. It was a half court basketball

Matthew Maschler:

Court. Court basketball. And I used to go and I have a son and daughter, David and Lindsay. And my son loved sports and he did not like restaurant behavior. So between ordering food, I could take him into the basketball court and he could dribble.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It was so nice, so

Matthew Maschler:

Little. And he would dribble around.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It was a good memory, good memory, good memories.

Matthew Maschler:

So old Voca. Yeah. That’s

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Good. I’ve been around for a long time out there.

Matthew Maschler:

And it’s funny you asked me, do I know Woodchuck? I kind of pride myself. I think I know every name in Boca. Every street in

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Boca. I know. I do too. I know. Someone’s like, do you know? I’m like, yes, I do. I’m like, I’ve lived here since 1989. I know every back road, side road and every InBetween, but Woodchuck is off the unbeaten path. Yeah. Woodchuck Chick, Munk and Little Bear. Those were the three roads in Cimarron.

Matthew Maschler:

Cimarron, okay. Yeah. Labrador is not far from there.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

That’s in Indian Hedge. Oh no, that’s in Palmetto Pines. Yeah. Palmetto Pines. That’s off of Palmetto. Yeah. Close to it. Close to

Matthew Maschler:

It. Yeah. Yeah. So that’s cool. So after graduating, so you went to Heights?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I went to Olympic Heights.

Matthew Maschler:

Was West Boca not built yet?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

No, not when I graduated. I’m 41, so it wasn’t built yet. Oh,

Matthew Maschler:

I see.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Okay. Yeah, not yet. My son went there.

Matthew Maschler:

He went to West Oak. Yeah. Where is he now?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

He was at UCF. He’s back here now. Okay, cool. He’s assigned to figure out what he wants to do in his life.

Matthew Maschler:

Nice. Nice kids. Did you go ahead to college?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I did. Where’d you go? I went to FSU and I went to FAU. And then once I got pregnant, I unenrolled. I was actually in school to be a neonatologist.

Matthew Maschler:

Neonatologist.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

That’s amazing. That was my dream.

Matthew Maschler:

What is that?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

So that is the physician that deals with the NICU babies.

Matthew Maschler:

Okay, gotcha.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

And that was my heart. Something I really wanted to do, and I really wish I would’ve stuck with it, but it was very difficult doing all the biology classes, having a newborn baby.

Matthew Maschler:

Oh, I couldn’t imagine.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

So it was too much. So I decided to open up businesses.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah. David was in the NICU for a few days. My wife was very determined not to leave the hospital with one baby and not the other.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Oh, because they’re twins.

Matthew Maschler:

They were twins. Yeah. David was in the nicu, but everybody came home together. We all came home together. That’s

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Good. That’s good. How far along was she when she gave birth?

Matthew Maschler:

What’s normal?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Thirty six, thirty seven. 30

Matthew Maschler:

Sevens full term. So I think they induced her at 33 or 34.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Okay. Yeah, it’s twins. Twins.

Matthew Maschler:

So they’re freshmen in college now.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Wow. Where do they go to school?

Matthew Maschler:

David’s at Wake Forest. So your Florida State just crushed them? Yep. And Lindsay’s up at University of Vermont.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Amazing.

Matthew Maschler:

And they have an amazing neonatology program. That’s not what Lindsay’s studied, but it’s a good program. So what are you currently with

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Max? I am with REM Max services with Dave Searl. Oh, with Dave

Matthew Maschler:

Searl. Yeah. Okay.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I love Dave. He’s my broker. I do too. He’s so sweet.

Matthew Maschler:

Did you know, I know Dave, or did you just brand him out? Dave s because

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

You know, I figured you would know him. Everyone know who doesn’t know Dave SSL in this town? Especially if you’re

Matthew Maschler:

In real estate. Yeah,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Especially if you’re in real. If you don’t know. It’s so funny, whenever somebody’s like, oh, where do you work on rem Max service? They’re like, who’s your broker? Like Dave Searl. I’ve never heard of him. What rock are you under? Business? He knows everybody. Everyone. Everybody. And everyone knows him. Can

Matthew Maschler:

I tell you how I met

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Him? How’d you meet him? He’s a character, so I can’t wait to hear the story.

Matthew Maschler:

Years ago, I don’t know if it was 2014, 2017, I don’t remember when. I was up for a realtor of the year, so I think it was 17. I was up for realtor of the year and I’m at the Realtors Association and I’m sitting at a table, Marshall Sklar.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I know Marshall, yeah.

Matthew Maschler:

David Searl. Ben Shater. And I didn’t know David Sill at the time. That’s why I don’t think it was 17, 18. That’s why I think it was 14. But regardless, I didn’t know David Searl at the time, and Marshall was looking at the other people that were nominated for Broker of the year. Ben Schachter was nominated for Broker of the Year. Marshall was nominated for Broker of the Year. And then when he was looking at the other broker of the year nominations, he shows me a picture of David Searl and he says, do you know this guy? And I was talking to someone, Marshall shows me the picture and he says, do you know this guy? I say, no. And I continue my conversation with the person next to me that I’m talking to that I was not friends with on Facebook and didn’t remember. I didn’t quite know who it was. I didn’t even know I was friends with him on Facebook. We just started a conversation. So I’m having a conversation. Marshall asked me if I know the guy. I look at the picture, I say, no, I don’t. I continue my conversation. And then Marshall doubles down, looks at his phone, he looks at who I’m talking to. He goes, asked me on the shoulder again. He goes, he goes, Matt, you talked

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Fairy Marshall. Like

Matthew Maschler:

That’s great. I like, oh, alright. Yeah, that’s David Sill. Alright.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

That’s so funny.

Matthew Maschler:

That’s great. And I think I might’ve been phrase to friends with him, but just didn’t even know he wanted talk over. That’s great. Not even know who he is.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

The incoming president now. He’s the incoming

Matthew Maschler:

President. Good guy.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, he’s a good guy. He’s a great broker. Sweet, sweet man.

Matthew Maschler:

Did you ever not live in Boca?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I lived in Saginaw, Michigan when I was younger. Saginaw,

Matthew Maschler:

Michigan. What brought you up

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

There? That’s where was born. So I was born in Saginaw and then we moved to Florida. My dad had a business here, so he exported us down to Florida. So that’s what brought us here in 1989.

Matthew Maschler:

What was his business down here?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

He did an import X business out overseas. Okay, cool. Yeah, they did apples. He did a lot of commercial real estate there. And then he did a lot of real estate here. So where I’m from in Michigan, it’s a really small town. It doesn’t have a huge population. So there’s not a ton of growth there. If you wanted a lot of opportunity. Yeah, not a ton. So we moved to Florida with my aunt and uncle and cousins, and here we are. Never turning back. I mean, we go there, we visited, but that’s not something I want to Where are you from? New York?

Matthew Maschler:

I grew up in Staten Island, New York.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Oh. One of my best friends are from Staten Island, New York. Do you know Jackie Chili? Craig Chili?

Matthew Maschler:

No, it’s not ringing a bell.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

They live here. They live here now. But they’re from Staten Island.

Matthew Maschler:

Chile, like

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

C-H-I-L-E-C-H-I-L-E. Hold on. Shout out

Matthew Maschler:

To Jackie Chile.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

She’s one of my closest friends. C-H-I-L-L-E-M. I wanted to make sure I was saying that right.

Matthew Maschler:

E-A-N-C-H-I.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah. Jackie. J-A-A-C-K.

Matthew Maschler:

I’m looking them up, but I think

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Her maiden name was Luca.

Matthew Maschler:

No dunno. But

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It’s so weird. Staten Island, small.

Matthew Maschler:

Staten Island is like the size of Palm Beach County. Maybe not. I think

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It’s similar. That’s a lot larger than I imagined. Yeah.

Matthew Maschler:

I mean certainly as population wise, but that’s what I compare it to. I don’t know how off I am. It’s like, oh, you’re from Palm Beach County. Do you know? I mean, it’s not like they were four high public high schools. There were, I dunno, 20

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

That many

Matthew Maschler:

Beach. It was Big Island was a little bit over half a million people.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

She had an older brother too. I can’t remember his name.

Matthew Maschler:

It would go back to that high

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

School. Yeah, her name was. Yeah. What high school? I’ll have to ask her. I know they lived in their house forever. I’ll send her a text message while we’re on here.

Matthew Maschler:

Right, right. Yeah. But I grew up in Staten Island. I guess Palm Beach County is bigger, so it’s over a million people. But

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Palm Beach County is huge

Matthew Maschler:

And land-wise, it’s huge.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, it is. It’s very large.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah. Anyway, grew up in Staten Island. Went to University of Maryland, Toro Law School. I was a lawyer for a while. I was a real estate lawyer in New Jersey and I moved down here with the babies and became a real estate broker.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

What made you get out of the real estate? Being a real estate attorney? Were you doing title work or what were you

Matthew Maschler:

Doing? Doing closings for like $700 an hour. And I was cutting checks to realtors for like 30 grand and I knew I was better than them. Not better as a person. I knew I’d be better at the job than

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

They were. What made you decide to be a broker?

Matthew Maschler:

I stopped liking going into people’s houses and repeating the same. I like to teach. That’s why I have my podcast and repeating the same things and I’m educating sellers, but I’m always at level one and I needed to get higher and more advanced and I’d rather train an agent and teach an agent than teach a seller or a buyer. And if I had more agents under me, I’d have more deals and I’d have a little bit more action. So it was more action for less work and more interesting stories and more interesting. Tough, tough deals I get when they get a little hair on them, when they get a little interesting. When someone comes to me with a problem and I like giving advice on how to fix it.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

When did you open up your brokerage?

Matthew Maschler:

So I’m a sub broker under Ben Shachter.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Okay. I know Ben.

Matthew Maschler:

And that was probably 2017 ish as well. I still sell. So the people under me, I am technically a competing broker because if

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

People, well, Dave is too.

Matthew Maschler:

Does he sell it all anymore?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yes. Really?

Matthew Maschler:

Yes. Okay. I didn’t think he did.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

He does. Yeah, he does. He still a competing broker. He still sells.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

He’s just a very, very, very busy man. Yeah,

Matthew Maschler:

I can imagine. He

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Travels once a week.

Matthew Maschler:

Wow. He does all of his association things.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, he’s very involved in the association.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah. Yeah. Your podcast and I haven’t listened to it. Is it about real estate or selling successes about other

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Things? So I deal a lot about real estate. In my podcast. I talk a lot about the field, how to become successful in real estate, the market today. I also discuss other entrepreneurs. I have other entrepreneurs on there saying how they got their raise to fame, how they became successful. I always like to pick everyone’s brain. I want to know how did you get to be successful? How did you get to be where you’re at? I always like to know because wealth is knowledge, right? Knowledge is. So the more we know, the more we make. And it’s so funny because before I used to be so afraid to ask. I’m like, are they going to think I’m stupid by asking? And then I got to a point where I’m like, I don’t even care. I want to know. I want to know. I want to be where that person dead. So I always ask a ton of questions and I don’t care anymore. If they don’t want to tell me, they don’t tell me. But nine times out of 10, they disclose. They want to share their story. People

Matthew Maschler:

Love talking about

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Themselves. They do. And I never knew that. I always felt like, oh my, am I going to offend them or are they going to think I’m not worthy enough for me to ask ’em these questions? And all of a sudden I’m asking multimillionaires, billionaires, how did you become successful? What did you do in your career? Did it come from family wealth or did you build it on your own? There’s only three ways to get very wealthy. You inherit it, you win the lottery or you work your butt off. So there’s only three ways to get it. There’s no other ways to get wealth. So I always want to know a lot of ’em, they come from a family history of wealth and a lot of them say, I’ve worked my tail off. I have had failed businesses. I’ve learned from them and I’ve grown and built other businesses. So that’s what I discuss on my podcast.

Matthew Maschler:

There’s a funny story, I don’t know if it’s true, but it reminds me of this funny joke. It’s ask the guy, multimillionaire the secret to his success. How did you become so wealthy? And he says, well, I started out in the produce industry and I bought a bushel of apples wholesale. And I cleaned them up and I presented ’em nice and I put ’em in my cart and I worked hard and I sold those apples and for twice what I paid. And I went out and I bought twice as many apples and worked hard. And after a few years, I grew the business from apples to other fruit and from a push cart to a retail shop. And then eventually my father passed away and I inherited all of his money.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

And then his father passed away and inherited. That’s how he got his

Matthew Maschler:

So

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Funny. That’s true. Yeah. So you don’t ever know. I work really hard. I go to a lot of networking events. I do a lot of, I wrote a book.

Matthew Maschler:

You wrote a book

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I did. It’s called Purpose Driven Paycheck.

Matthew Maschler:

Love it. Is it

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

On Amazon? It’s on Amazon. Purpose

Matthew Maschler:

Driven paycheck. I got to write

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

That down. Purpose driven paycheck. It discusses I am divorced and it discusses I gave up a multimillion dollar company and walked away with clothes on my back. Wow. But it came to my conclusion with me going through divorce, the business was not the successful thing. It was the person running the business that was successful. So I’m like, I got to take what I know and implement it into something that I do know, which is businesses.

Matthew Maschler:

What’s your biggest obstacle as a real estate agent?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Trying to convince people that now is the time to buy. Right. No, perfect market. I think that’s my biggest challenge. There’s no perfect market and you can’t tell somebody else if they need to buy a house, they need to buy a house. We can try to price. Are you in real estate too? Yeah. So imagine we’re all trying to sit there and help our clients and lead them and guide them for when is the perfect time to buy a house. I’m like, now when you’re ready is the time that you buy a house. You can never price it. Then if the market is going down, you’re going to wait until it goes down to what? Until it gets to be nothing. And then everyone else is going to be bidding. And then you’re going to go, okay, well when it steady off and I’m not competing against 80 other offers, I’ll buy it.

Okay, now I’m going to wait until the interest rates go. So there’s always going to be ups and downs, in and outs in real estate, and I try to help them and guide them and lead them. If you need to buy a house, I am not one for renting. I’m very anti renter because I feel like you’re flushing money down the toilet every single month. You’re paying somebody else’s mortgage. They think I work with a ton of investors. Everyone thinks you because their rental prices right now in South Florida, as you guys know, they’re insane. They’re more than the mortgages, but they’re still waiting. They’re going to spend $200,000 on rent over the next couple years, but they’re going to get a hundred thousand dollars off of the house that they might buy, right?

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah. Renting is okay if you’re in Fluxx, right? Yes. Renting, if you’re recently divorced, if you’re due to the area, dunno the area. When you rent, you really want to give yourself that one year you rent for the year because you’re in transition. That’s fine. You have to really, and the mistake people make is renewing because it’s easy. And they renew. Renew and they renew and then they missed the market. And then everybody complains that the rents went up. Well, yeah, your rent went up because the market went up. And what’s crushing right now is you have all these seniors on fixed incomes and they’ve been renting for 10 years and landlord jacked the price on. I’m like, yeah, because you missed all of that market appreciation. So not only do you lose the market appreciation, but you’re exposed to double. You’re exposed to market risk much, much more. There’s a lot of market risk in renting. And I had a customer and she rented every year, every year the same one over and over. And we go out looking at the end and she decided to stay. And I said, you have to get out now because everything that you don’t like every year, your budget is smaller, a hundred percent you like less and you’re going to miss. But we’re dealing with,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

There’s no perfect

Matthew Maschler:

House. We’re dealing with people on fixed incomes now that have no alternative. And it’s heartbreaking. Heartbreaking because people are like, why’d my landlord do this to me? They think their landlord did something to them.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

First of all, their landlord’s rent. Their landlord’s insurance have gone up triple here in south Florida. So even though they don’t want to increase it, they don’t have an option either. I deal with a lot of investors or they sell

Matthew Maschler:

The property because they bought it for 180. It’s not worth three 50. Right. That rate of return has to be based on the current

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Market. A hundred percent. I can’t even tell you what I have a listing in Century Village for because it’s ridiculous.

Matthew Maschler:

200.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

No, no, I’m talking about for rent. Rent are one bedroom, one bathroom. It’s $1,800 a month. Imagine these fixed incomes.

Matthew Maschler:

And the other risk that people don’t realize when they’re renting is if they sold something and that money that would’ve went to buy a house, then they start to rent for a year. But after four or five years that nest egg has been reduced, reduced, reduced by the annual rent, and people don’t have discipline. They invade that nest egg for a vacation or whatnot. So if your house was three 20 and you sold your house for six 50, there was that run up. Now you have six 50, but you don’t buy that house right away. You rent something for 3000 a month, 3000 a month, $36,000 a year, right After five years, that’s a hundred grand. Out of that six 50, that six 50 is reduced after five buy $125,000. And if you take any other money out of it now you don’t even have the ability to buy something else.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I know. I see it all too often.

Matthew Maschler:

Renting is very dangerous. People think it’s safe.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

They think it’s safe. They’re like, I’m not responsible for fixing anything. I’m like, how much is a refrigerator? Seriously? Let’s be real. How much is an ac? Trust me, you are paying it time and time again. You’re paying it. You’re paying it.

Matthew Maschler:

So besides the market risk, it’s that nest egg that cannot

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Sometimes

Matthew Maschler:

Cannot be replaced.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It’s crazy, but it’s true. Yeah, it’s very scary. So what are you guys seeing right now in the market? How are you guys doing in the market right now?

Matthew Maschler:

My biggest obstacle in real estate is competing against everybody has a friend, neighbor, mother in.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I think that’s going to be changing. Yeah, that’s going to be changing very soon.

Matthew Maschler:

But I think the market set right after several years of that runup, the market set inventory is still low, but it’s not absurdly low. The prices set where they are and will continue to appreciate at a modest rate. It always has. Like you said, there’s no perfect time. You can’t time the market. Unlike other investments, when you buy real estate, especially for your primary residence, it’s not like buying a stock. You need a place to live. If you’re wanting to make that move to Florida and you delay that move by three years, four years, five years, you’ve delayed your life by four or five years. So there are people that are waiting for prices to return. You sound like your dad waiting for the prices to come down. If your lifestyle demands bigger house, smaller house, different house, different location, follow your lifestyle, the financial factor of it will follow. You can still be disciplined financially, but if your lifestyle necessitates a change, don’t be afraid to make that change because you’re somehow scared of

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Market. You’re chasing the market. You can’t chase the market. One thing I’ve learned in real estate over the years is you can never chase the market. We don’t know what’s going to happen. And I’ve got so many people that will bump into me at the grocery store and they’re like, where do you think the market is going? I’m like, boy, if I had my crystal ball, I could tell you I’d be a billionaire. But it’s like we don’t know day to day, unfortunately.

Matthew Maschler:

I’ve had a customer in Delaware Country Club, she wants to buy country club. She lives in Chicago. And every year I show her some houses and then after about four years, she realized I’m showing her the same models and the prices just keep going up. Are just going up, are just up and up and up. And then the joining fees to join these clubs keep going up and up and up. So that’s I think a very strange thing. In the central book of market where I live in Woodfield, they’re about to raise which Woodfield Woodfield Country Club. So there’s no golf available. And

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I know we have to talk about this for a second because back how long have you been in real estate for?

Matthew Maschler:

Six years

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Now. Okay. Back in the day, I couldn’t sell a country club community for anything in the bad market. In a bad market in any market. I could not sell a country club because it was very difficult. You had to buy-in and then the mandatory membership fees. Now we had the influx of everyone down here they loved, I mean, they couldn’t get enough of the country clubs

Matthew Maschler:

During Covid if you couldn’t vacation. We changed the way people live. They want to live in a vacation resort style. So Woodfield went from having a surplus of empty memberships to being full

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

And saying, we can’t accept any more memberships. Same thing with all the other communities. Boca Grove, it’s the same thing. I couldn’t believe it. I remember talking to the membership, they’re like, well, we’re on a waiting list. I’m like, I’m sorry you’re on a waiting list. She goes, I thought I would never hear those words come out of my mouth. But that goes to show you we cannot predict anything in real estate

Matthew Maschler:

Woodfield because there’s only one course and over 1200 homes, it should have always been full. There’s only about 420 golf members. So now that all the golf members are active and playing, there’s just no way. So you have mandatory membership for a social membership, mandatory membership, and it’s going up to $120,000. And you could buy in the Oaks and get basically the same lifestyle, pickleball, tennis, swimming pool, and a restaurant. It’s not a full country club. So you don’t have the full restaurant and catering, but you just don’t have to pay the 20.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

You don’t have to pay the buy-in. But their HOA fees are around the same thing. They’re about $1,200 a month.

Matthew Maschler:

But that’s not as bad as the country club dues and HOA,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Right? Right.

Matthew Maschler:

So if you’re not a golfer, if you’re not a golfer, it doesn’t make sense to join a golf

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Club. A hundred percent

Matthew Maschler:

Me and Country Club St. Andrew’s, if you’re not a golfer, but now would feel

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

They want the social aspect of it.

Matthew Maschler:

People want

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Social aspect. And before you know what a lot of the country clubs, it was the older families coming down here when their kids were already grown that it’s like a vacation home for them. Now. We had the surplus of families coming in and really getting involved with the social memberships.

Matthew Maschler:

I have a neighbor, he’s a doctor from Chicago. He’s been a member of Woodfield for 20 years. He always figured when he retired he can up to golf. So during Covid, it’s a good time to retire and move to Florida full time. And by the time he got in and he goes to the membership office, he said, I want to upgrade to golf. And they tell him that he’s on a waiting list. Holy cow. And he’s like, you always told me I can upgrade to golf whenever I wanted.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Not anymore. Not anymore.

Matthew Maschler:

For years, they would tell him he could up pick the golf whenever he wants. So now he’s like, no. Well, you’re 50 on the wait list having to come off the wait list of years. He’ll have to go to

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Cheese the Boca Resort and go get a membership over there. But

Matthew Maschler:

They got rid of, they had two golf courses. Now they only have one

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Because they increased the surplus of their social.

Matthew Maschler:

But it was mind boggling to me because that’s what I did as a member of Woodfield Nongo member. So the extra equity buy-in and the extra dues, I figured it’s more economical for me. I’ll join the Booker Resort and I’ll have the beach aspect of it, and I don’t play that much golf. So if I want to play golf, I could play at one of their two courses. But then they sold off their one course, so now they only have the other course.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, I’m not a golfer, but I’ve used the Booker Resort for multiple social activities and events. Social

Matthew Maschler:

Activities are fun. The other thing that they did over the years from, I don’t know when they did it, it was five years, 15 years ago, they sold off a lot of land around the golf course for housing. So one of the reasons I enjoyed the country club course over the resort course was

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

That over by the bungalows. The

Matthew Maschler:

Resort course is on the grounds. The Country club course was on Congress across from Costco. But the one on the grounds, some of the holes are cut short a little bit because of the residential land of the golf course that they developed over the years. So yeah, it goes by the bungalows and by the pink tower, not by the pink tower, by the

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Main building,

Matthew Maschler:

The main buildings. But that was a good option. But Preston actually find out for me, I’m curious side note, how much the poker Ratton Resort is to join nowadays. Oh

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah. Ridiculous. So I did you buy in?

Matthew Maschler:

I bought in 10 or 12 when the economy was totally in the toilet and when I moved here it was like 45,000 to join and got to do it now because about to raise it, they were going to raise it to 55,000. And then they reached out to me a couple of years later, Hey, do you want to join for 28,000?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Okay. I was just going to say, because my parents’ really good friend bought into the book resort and I actually was trying to buy the membership off of her 17,000.

Matthew Maschler:

17,000. They joined one home

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Was what she joined for, and then she had her annual dues, but they were like $450 a month back then. Yeah, back then. And I tried buying it from her, and then when Covid happened, I reached out to her. I’m like, I’ll buy your membership. Because everyone, we were scared of what was going to happen. I’m like, I will buy your membership. I’m like, 25,000. She’s like, I’m not selling it. I’m like, come on.

Matthew Maschler:

But during the bad market, when the market was in Tank and then the Madoff thing happened, I was looking for people that were selling their membership, somebody needed. So they offered it to me for 28, then 23. And at one point they said to me, okay, Matt, this is one time only this week only no financing. It’s a one time check. 17 five.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Okay.

Matthew Maschler:

So I got it for 17 five. I got it

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

For 17,000 too,

Matthew Maschler:

And I got them to throw in. They threw in a bunch of stuff, like a thousand dollars credit towards the restaurants, and they threw in a stay in spot.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

The

Matthew Maschler:

Same thing with her spot credit and a cabana credit. They gave me a whole bunch of goodies too. But now, I mean, I’m guessing 80, but I don’t know.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Well, since they redid the renovations, I’ve had some friends buy in there and it’s anywhere from 80 to one 20.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah. So if you can, yeah, no, I’ll check on that. I used to know, and I used to know the membership person because I used to, me

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Too. They used to our agents to come in there and bring clients.

Matthew Maschler:

But now I don’t even know who to call

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Anymore. I don’t either. I don’t. I’ve called them before and they don’t even answer the phone anymore.

Matthew Maschler:

And I’ve asked them, I’m like, all right, well, I don haven’t really used the club in years and you remodeled.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Are you still

Matthew Maschler:

A member? I’m a member and can I have a membership tour? They’re like, well, if you’re already a member, we’re not going to give you a membership tour. I’m like, but I don’t know. Do they still

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Have the stakes House up top?

Matthew Maschler:

No.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Gone. What’s up

Matthew Maschler:

Top? Is it 5 0 1 East? Not 5 0 1 East. What’s up there now?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I haven’t been there in while.

Matthew Maschler:

State has you talking about Old Homestead.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I don’t remember the name of it.

Matthew Maschler:

Last one was 5 0 1 East, but then

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

The one in the tower.

Matthew Maschler:

Oh, in the tower. They haven’t had a restaurant up there in a long time. That was blue it was

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It blue? What’s up there now? Nothing.

Matthew Maschler:

No, because they closed the tower for the huge renovation.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. But they’re not cylinder renovation. I thought they were finalized with everything. The

Matthew Maschler:

Towers open up again. I don’t know if there’s a restaurant up there yet. The tower just

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Opened. That was the most beautiful. You could see everything from there. It was absolutely gorgeous.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah. There was a Gordon Ramsey protege that opened up a restaurant up on the top of the tower, and that was really, really good. But that didn’t last more than a couple months. Oh, that’s disappointing.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

They had something downstairs too. I cannot remember the name of it. It was another famous person.

Matthew Maschler:

Maori Moto.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Maori Moto.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah. That’s closed.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Closed. Do they have serendipity still

Matthew Maschler:

In there? No, that’s now Del’s Deli.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Oh, a deli.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I got to go in, let’s go. I got to go in the Bookers or I got to go around to see.

Matthew Maschler:

See, we got to call membership and get a tour.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, because I haven’t been there in forever. Call

Matthew Maschler:

Membership if they’ll do a tour for our realtors. Okay,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

We need to buy Becky. We need to see. I need to see what’s going on. It’s been a while. It’s

Matthew Maschler:

Been a while.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Know

Matthew Maschler:

You haven’t seen the whole new pool complex.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Actually, I did go by the new pool. Well, it was still under construction, so we went, they had still had Flow Rider. Do they still have Flow Rider?

Matthew Maschler:

I think so.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

This was at the main tower and then they were redoing the beach. They just got done with the beach side. So then we went to Beachside.

Matthew Maschler:

Oh, I’ve gone to the beach since they, well, I mean, I’ve gone to the beach. They did the beach a long time ago. Did they do the beach again recently? No,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Long time ago. I

Matthew Maschler:

Hate what they did to the beach club.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, I don’t blame you.

Matthew Maschler:

What did them do? You used to go in and there was you pull in, there was an amazing view of the beach. They literally blocked it with

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

The hotel,

Matthew Maschler:

With the furniture. How can, you

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Can’t see it. If you’re in the room, you can, I

Matthew Maschler:

Read an article like five restaurant renovations by major restaurant icons that did these renovations. So what happened is they reoriented the restaurant to go left, which makes sense for the flow of the restaurant, but it blocked the view from when you walked in because you walked into the hotel towards the middle of the restaurant. There was a long fountain and a huge ocean view by reorienting the restaurant left. Right. They filled in the fountain and they put up a wall like a bar or something blocking the view, so as the restaurant works, but that restaurant would work in a basement, not in a billion dollar view, million dollar view, but inflation. So now you walk into the club into the thing, and instead of having that billion dollar view, you’re just in a hotel lobby and then the beach bar, instead of just having burgers and salads and Turkey sandwiches, they made it like Mediterranean. If you were in a beach house, sitting on the beach, you had a little falafel or something.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I’ve had hummus at the pool many times.

Matthew Maschler:

That’s what they serve now. They put in little tiny chairs and they used to just have deck chairs. Comfortable that you go to the beach, get a deck chair at a cheeseburger.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yep. So now, very true. Do they have it at the pool? The other pool?

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah, the pool haven’t been, they opened up a lot of things by the pool, but I don’t want to sit by the pool. I got to pool at home. I want to go to the beach.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, it’s true. It’s true. Yeah. They said you bonfire. Do you go to any of the events there or No, I haven’t

Matthew Maschler:

Been forever. I want to start going again, which is why I need a member to,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, I think I

Matthew Maschler:

Went to the Halloween party Saturday night.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Oh, at the book of Resort? Yeah.

Matthew Maschler:

How was it? The Saturday before Halloween. It was very nice. Not a lot of people really. My father used to tell me about the book of resort that he say you have to bring your own game in any other country club. Broke it down. Polo Club. The other people, and even if you don’t, you show up, but they put you in force them, because it’s a hotel and it’s a transient thing. You have to kind of bring your own game. You have to bring your friends and put out with them. So that’s how the Halloween party was. If it was really like a members event, like 4th of July, I know a ton of people because a lot of members go for 4th of July, but I didn’t, didn’t really know anyone for Halloween. So I just have to remember next time, just invite a bunch of people.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Treat it. How many members people can you bring in from the outside?

Matthew Maschler:

As long as you pay you, it doesn’t matter.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Okay.

Matthew Maschler:

Okay. So that’s how you have to treat it. If I, if it was anywhere near mine or my wife’s birthday, I’d bring 50 people and pretended it’s our birthday party. It was the nicest bar mitzvah nicest party you’d

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Ever seen. Percent. Yeah.

Matthew Maschler:

There’s just not a lot of people and I didn’t know anyone, so,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Oh, man. Interesting.

Matthew Maschler:

So it’s two months before my birthday. It’s too early to call it a birthday party.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, too early. Too early. Your birthday’s December,

Matthew Maschler:

November 20th, November. It’s not around. It’s not. So about three weeks.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, it’s coming up soon.

Matthew Maschler:

Coming up soon.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Thanksgiving week.

Matthew Maschler:

Yeah. It’s never actually on Thanksgiving.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It’s just during the week. Yeah,

Matthew Maschler:

Because the earliest Thanksgiving can be is the 22nd. My birthday is the 20th. Okay. The latest it can be is the 28th. Yes. If the first Thursday of the month is the first eighth, 15th, 22nd. So my birthday can never be on Thanksgiving.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

So tell me about this briefcase money in the bank.

Matthew Maschler:

It’s from WWE Wrestling. Oh,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Interesting. That’s your other podcast, right?

Matthew Maschler:

Well, the other

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Podcast you have two podcasts.

Matthew Maschler:

Two podcasts, real Estate finder and math mania. Matthew Mania is not necessarily about wrestling. It could just be about anything I want, if I want to interview my mom, I’ll bring her on the Math Mania podcast, not the Real Estate Finder podcast. We’re just not talking business or anything. If it’s business or real estate, real estate related business finance, real estate related, could be broad but not so broad that I could just talk about to my mom or talk about if someone wants to talk about Star Wars, we can get on the podcast, we can talk about whatever we want. Restaurants, theoretically, you can get that into real estate if you’re talking about,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

So let me pick both of your brains. I get this question a lot. So I’m going to ask you guys this question. What are the interest rates you think are going to be by the end of the year, and what do you think they’re going to be at the beginning of next year?

Matthew Maschler:

Do you want to go? I mean, I’ll give it a shot. I don’t know. What are the factors that affect what the interest rates are going to be, especially with what’s just going on in the world right now? I mean, I don’t think they’re going to go up too much more, but I don’t think that they’re done going up.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, I just got the email today there at 7.79%

Matthew Maschler:

For a first mortgage, primary money. On the flip side, that means your bank account, savings accounts, CDs, bonds, et cetera, should start you paying. So

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

If they have money invested,

Matthew Maschler:

If you have money, but if you have any money, even if you just have a savings account with a couple of hundred dollars in it right now, what you should be doing is looking at that rate. If you’re at Bank of America and Bank of America is paying you 1% on your savings account, either find out if they have another product or go to another bank because you can get four and 5% on savings accounts now. So it’s on you as the person responsible for yourself to make sure that you are, if you have CDs, if you have savings accounts, if you have accounts that you’re not just sitting there in a bad account, you can change your bank or change your account or use one of the online accounts. There’s ways of taking advantage of the fact that interest rates are up. You don’t want to be in a situation where interest, right?

You are like, you’re locked in on your mortgage, that’s good, but you’re not getting money on Frank. You complain about mortgage rates and yeah, obviously you’re borrowing on your houses. You’re borrowing a lot more than you might have saved in the bank, but you may have 4 0 1 Ks or IRAs. It now is the time we’re bringing up interest rates. Now is the time to look at, it’s like the reminder. Look at your bank statements and look at your financials and take advantage of the fact that interest rates are up if you can. That’s the my message,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

And I think everyone right now should be looking at their finances. Go in there, go on your phones, go on your subscriptions. How many unnecessary things are we subscribed to? If you go on your phone, I guarantee there’s some subscriptions on there. You’re like, what am I paying 4 99? But we don’t see it or feel the hit of it 4 99 a month or 2 99 or whatever it might

Matthew Maschler:

Be, but it

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Adds up. Yeah. I had a first time home buyer the other day come to me and I was like, well, let’s look at your finances. Let’s dabble into them a little bit. And my mortgage guy that I use was like, Becky, he has over $400 in a month in subscriptions because he was paying for two Amazon primes. He was paying for two Netflix’s. He said he didn’t realize that he was paying for both of them. He’s like, I don’t ever see it. He’s like, so he was paying for two different insurance companies on his rental property. He thought one expired, but it auto renewed. Ouch. So he’s like, I just didn’t think about it. So I’m like, you’re wasting all the $400 a month. That’s

Matthew Maschler:

Significant. I have the Disney bundle. Yes, Disney, Hulu and ESPN plus, but I was also being charged for Hulu and I couldn’t straighten it out. It took me so long to straighten out. I finally said, alright, you know what? I’m going to sit down. I’m going to talk to customer service. I finally got that straightened out, but when I did it, my son overheard, oh, we haves ESPN plus. I wish I knew.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, right. I’m

Matthew Maschler:

Like, oh, we have us ESP plus. Yeah. So funny, when people have two Amazon primes or two, it’s easy to have, if you live in an HOA community and the HOA provides HBO in the cable, don’t subscribe to Max and pay money to max. You already get it with your cable.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It’s so funny. I have not paid a cable bill. My HOA does not pay it, but I have not paid a cable bill in three years. I make my kids stream everything online,

Matthew Maschler:

But they have to have an account with someone.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

We have an account, we have a ton of accounts. That’s why I’m like, I’m not paying for basic cable and paying for HBO Max, which is on at t. If you guys have at THBO, max is free.

Matthew Maschler:

Oh,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Interesting. Yeah. So get rid of your HBO Max if you’re paying for it. Little tips and tricks.

Matthew Maschler:

How do you watch Network tv?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I don’t. You don’t? Okay. I don’t mean I don’t need, it’s brainless activities. So if I want to learn something, I go on a podcast or something.

Matthew Maschler:

Some people who don’t have cable have the Hulu TV or YouTube tv.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I used to have Apple tv, but then I was like, forget it. My kids were watching Disney. Then they stopped. So I wasn’t paying for anything.

Matthew Maschler:

Apple TV and Disney TV don’t get you the network. Hulu, it’s so confusing. Hulu TV and YouTube TV give you the basic cable, but it’s much more expensive. Like Hulu TV is $80

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

A

Matthew Maschler:

Month, a month. So it gives you Hulu and what I’ll call cable, the Bravos and Comedy Centrals and ease of the world in the basic cable.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah. I don’t watch any of that stuff. Nothing. I try really hard not to watch the news either. So when somebody sends me an article, I’m like, stop. I don’t want to see it. I’m blind to the world.

Matthew Maschler:

Blind

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

To the world. I don’t don’t want to see all that negativity. I’m better off not knowing

Matthew Maschler:

Sometimes. Sometimes.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

And in the real estate market, I’m so invested in it. I go to many events. I get told everything with real estate. So I learn it. I figure it out. I know you guys probably get the same emails. I get like eight emails a day about the market. So I am always on it.

Matthew Maschler:

And the amazing thing is when interest rates are low, you can grab a 30 year mortgage and it’s fixed for 30 years when interest rates are high. So there’s seven, eight, so get that 30 year mortgage and when interest rates drop, refinance.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Exactly.

Matthew Maschler:

And that’s why. And there’s lots of different theories, but that’s one of the reasons I don’t particularly buy down rates because I’d rather use that money for the eventual refinance. Some people, if they know they’re not going to refinance, buy down the rate. They’re all good strategies, but what’s not a good strategy is to do nothing because you’re scared of the rates. Pay 8%, get 5% on your savings, et cetera. And when interest rates go down, refinance it.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Right? Or you can get the seller to buy it down. You negotiate that because we’re negotiating now. I love negotiating is my favorite thing to do. And now we’re back to negotiating. Before it was crazy. You had to give your first firstborn child in order to close a deal, and I felt everyone’s like, did you kill it the last few years? I’m like, honestly, that was my hardest time in real estate. I’m competing against 80 other offers.

Matthew Maschler:

What do you mean kill it? My buyers couldn’t get offers accepted. Right.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It was hard. I

Matthew Maschler:

Worked 10 times harder for my buyers than I ever did before,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Ever. And it was a struggle because then it’s like you said, brother, sister, cousin, neighbor, whoever. Barber down the road just got her real estate license. Everybody got their real, it was like a trend. It’s so funny. I was in a room one time and I looked around and I told the person next to me show, how many real estate agents do you think are in here? I’m like, out of 30 people, I bet. 2,500 license. I’m like, but there’s only one of me. Right?

Matthew Maschler:

That’s my spiel. When people ask me, what do I do? I said, I’m in real estate just like everyone else in Florida who has a driver’s license. It’s true, but it’s supposed to be a fun comedic way of breaking the ice.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

It’s true. But I think that in the next couple years when people have to renew their dues, because it’s not cheap in real estate, it’s not. So when they have to, I don’t know with signature, but I know what I have to pay every single year just for the MLS. What is it? 8 50, 8 50 for the year, and then that’s just one fraction of it. Then you have to pay your supras, then you have to pay your, whoever you’re with, it adds up. I think I pay for the year between my dues, my franchise fees. I think I pay 6,500 just for the year just to be an agent. And then you have all your other side things that you got to pay for. But I have a feeling in the next couple years, people that just got their license during our whole last couple years, you’re going to see them now. You have to work real estate. You have to go back to what we did years ago.

Matthew Maschler:

I wanted to ask a question, and it was because working on finishing our newsletter for the month, and in there there’s a section in the podcast where Stacy asked the question, was there ever a time where you wanted to quit or came close to quitting? And I’m just curious if you, throughout your journey, even though you’re at this place, a great success, did you have that intense low where it’s like,

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I want to be done? I love your question. I actually love this question. Have you guys ever read, think and Grow Rich? Yeah. Yeah. Okay. So I love that question. So it’s one of my favorite books. Obviously, we’ve all thought about quitting everything in life, but I never quit. The thought has popped up in my head about, oh, maybe it would be better to go work a nine to five. Then I throw up in my mouth a little bit and say, I could never work a nine to five. I am not a nine to five. I’m more of a 24 hour girl. That is just not me. I love working in the field. I love working with my buyers and sellers. I love my commercial real estate. I love it. I love being only 1% of females in commercial real estate because there aren’t a ton out there.

That’s huge. So I’m just one of very little. So I promote myself that way. So life can be hard. I’m a single mom, I am divorced, and I have my kids. So there are days I’m like, oh my God, how nice would it be to have paid vacation? What is that paid vacation? What is sick days? What is getting your insurance paid for? What that looks like and I’m like, no, I still love my life. But obviously the thought has always crossed all of our minds. It’d be easier to go work, but for me it’d be harder mentally because it’s not what I’m built of. So the answer to your question is yes, but no. Yes, but no, never. I’m not a quitter. And I feel like right when people want to give up is right when they’re about ready to have their breakthrough. So many agents I’ve seen in this field, they give up before they’re even, they’ve hit their success.

It’s so hard. I can’t do it. I’m like, you’re almost there. Just hold on. You’ve just got to hold on for your dear life for a little bit. You’re going to make it. You just haven’t given yourself enough time. And then you see, all of a sudden her sister, brother cousin hits the lottery and they’re buying a $50 million house. And they could have had that sale, but they got out too soon. Soon they got to out too soon. So it’s like you never know what’s going to happen. But what about you? Have you ever thought about leaving the industry?

Matthew Maschler:

I have a few times. Yeah. My background’s in music. I did not plan on coming to Florida. I did not plan on getting on real estate. It was really kind of a whim and it was a big, I don’t say a big faith decision and that’s a whole nother conversation. But I got into it and I’m here six years later. I love it. And it’s also, it’s a part of my bigger why and my vision for life. So that’s why I’m just push through, suck it up. If I’m having a stressful day, I know I can look forward to sleeping the night. Even if it’s three, four or five hours. There’s a time

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Where never

Matthew Maschler:

Sleeps. No. And it doesn’t. And I just see it as all these challenges that I’m facing, whether it be real estate or personal and whatnot, the saying’s true. It doesn’t kill you. It makes you stronger. And it’s just, you got to keep going through whatever it is. And I do ask myself, sometimes I get concerned if I get too prideful that I don’t want to ask for help or why am I doing this? Am I doing this because I’m trying to prove someone else wrong? Or am I doing this because I actually want to do this? And I know what my why is my big why. And it’s like, you know what? I don. I don’t like to make rash decisions. I try not to. And I’m still here and I still have a vision of what I want to do with music down the road. But I love, love, love real estate. There’s so many things that

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

I do too. And I think that’s what keeps me

Matthew Maschler:

Here.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, you have to have a passion for it. And I love hate getting the deals that they’re like, I worked with an Asian, I couldn’t get a house. I’m like, darn it. Now I am like, I’m determined to get you something. I put it as my goal to find it. And I always do. I love a good challenge, but it can be challenging. And real estate is not for everybody. You have to love the industry. You have to love, you have to love it. I enjoy going to work every day. Yeah, true. When I go meet a client, I’m very happy. I love it. I love writing contracts. We all love writing contracts. I love negotiating. I don’t get deterred by the other agent yelling and screaming because they’ve had it on the market for 60 days and they told their sellers that they were going to get X amount of dollars. I’m like, well, you got to tell them that now you got an offer of X. But it’s like, I really do love our industry. I love that. Our relationships in the industry. So back in the day when I first got licensed, you would not want to be in the room with the other realtors. They were your competition. And I’ve had to transform my brain as like, they’re not my competition, they’re my companions. They are who I go to. I

Matthew Maschler:

Love talking to other realtors.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Me too. But back in the day, it was not like that.

Matthew Maschler:

And there are a lot of realtors that still don’t talk to other realtors. It’s weird. And I come from a law background. I’m a licensed attorney and it’s so weird. Attorneys, they clash and fight at work, but then after work you could put the gloves down and go to the and hang out. Realtors are supposed to cooperate unless is all about cooperation. So at work we cooperate and then everybody at home. So it’s the exact opposite. But I’m used to collaborating. I want to collaborate with you because I want to, when I have a listing for you to bring me the buyer and I want to know you. And that way we can work together. Absolutely. And if you have a listing, I want to bring you the buyer.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Yeah, you want to do business that, we said this before, I think off air, but I said, you want to do business with people and trust. It’s so much easier to do a transaction with people. So it’s so funny. Everyone’s like, you’re going to go to that networking group. There’s eight real estate agents. I’m like, great. I can’t wait to meet

Matthew Maschler:

Them after the price. The first thing I look for on any offer is

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Who’s the agent? I look at the agents too. I look at the agents actually before I look at anything because I’d like to know before price. Well, yeah. Well, because I want to know, do I know this person? Are they, because we know who we have in the industry. And it’s nice to be able to work with somebody that you know and can call ’em on the phone back, here’s my situation, here’s my buyer. And you literally lay it on the line. Some agents will be like, the sellers won’t entice any of that before you even waste your time on the property. So it’s nice to be able to have that communication with other agents that we know and we can be open and honest with them. Absolutely.

Matthew Maschler:

Alright, thank you so much

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

For joining. Thank you for having me on me.

Matthew Maschler:

I look forward to being on your podcast.

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

Absolutely. In a couple weeks.

Matthew Maschler:

Couple weeks. That’s exciting. Alright. Thank you for joining us on the Real Estate Finder podcast. Oh, tell people, how could they get ahold of you?

Rebecca Skiba Mancini:

So I’m on social media. My name is Becky s Skiba Mancini. It’s S-K-E-B-A. Or please feel free to call me anytime. (954) 871-7545.

Matthew Maschler:

And check out the Selling Success podcast. Thank you. I’m Matthew Maschler, real estate finder, Preston Smith Real Estate Finder. And we’ll see you next week.

Speaker 3:

The future looks bright and the stones pass by the sky’s dark blue when it’s almost that time. Light shows cameras flash when I pass. Living in the moment, forget about the past. They saved the best for last. Matthew Mania. We about to make a splash. Life is a marathon full of sharp turns. Got to keep pace while the hands on the clock turns high stakes. Five star real estate. I run a show. You can tell the boss, center place electricity, energy, vibrate. I’m always on time. Even if I’m, I make dreams come true. Living my life. Hope the same for you. Success in my sights got a real clear view.

Speaker 4:

It’s, it’s it. What time it?

Speaker 3:

It’s you. Time. What time? Mania. You know what time? Whose time? It’s, you know what time It’s mania. Yeah. Got him shook, scared. Can’t look. We’re not afraid of the big bad wolf first comes to Right.